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New CVD Risk Factors for Lowered Cognitive Functioning

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00037310
First Posted: May 17, 2002
Last Update Posted: July 29, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  Purpose
To explore the associations between cognitive functioning and three major cardiovascular disease risk factors: high blood pressure; high total plasma homocysteine (tHcy); and ApoE e4 genotype.

Condition
Cardiovascular Diseases Heart Diseases Hypertension Neurologic Manifestations

Study Type: Observational

Further study details as provided by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI):

Study Start Date: April 2001
Study Completion Date: March 2007
Primary Completion Date: March 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

Arterial hypertension and high blood pressure (HBP) are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke; they are also risk factors for lowered cognitive functioning. Except for diabetes, there have been comparatively few studies of other common risk factors, particularly with regard to interrelationships among risk factors which may adversely affect cognitive ability.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study examines associations between cognitive functioning and three cardiovascular risk factors: 1) high blood pressure; 2) high total plasma homocysteine (tHcy), and 3) ApoE e4 genotype. These associations are examined cross-sectionally as well as longitudinally, using data collected at a follow-up visit of members of a cohort that has been followed for the past 18-19 years. Longitudinal data are used to examine both current and change in cognitive functioning. Some analyses are prospective (e.g., high blood pressure and change in cognitive functioning), while others are cross-sectional (e.g., ApoE e4 and current cognitive functioning) or retrospective (e.g., tHcy and change in cognitive functioning). Structural equation models are used to examine cross-sectional data in elucidating a general theoretical model. Two-stage growth curve analyses and survival analyses are appropriate methods for analyzing the longitudinal data. The study includes a very comprehensive set of measures that have already been collected or will be collected during the follow-up visit. All potential confounders of the association between the three target predictor variables and the various domains of cognitive functioning appear to have been included in this design.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
No eligibility criteria
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00037310


Sponsors and Collaborators
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Investigators
OverallOfficial: Merrill Elias University of Maine
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00037310     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1161
R01HL067358 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: May 16, 2002
First Posted: May 17, 2002
Last Update Posted: July 29, 2016
Last Verified: January 2008

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms