Atrial Fibrillation Incidence, Risk Factors and Genetics

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. Identifier: NCT00021905
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 10, 2001
Last Update Posted : July 24, 2008
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

Brief Summary:
To assess the risk of incident atrial fibrillation after stopping anti-hypertensive medication including beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors. Also, to assess the role of genetics in subsequent risk of stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation.

Condition or disease
Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular Diseases Heart Diseases Hypertension Cerebrovascular Accident Arrhythmia

Detailed Description:


Prevention and treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is a significant public health issue. Atrial fibrillation affects 9 percent of persons aged 80 to 89. It is associated with elevated risk of stroke and death. The condition is likely to increase as survival rates from myocardial infarction continue to improve, prevalence of congestive heart failure grows, and treatment approaches evolve. The study will assess the safety of commonly used medications in relation to the risk of incident atrial fibrillation, and will assess the association of several genetic polymorphisms with stroke risk after AF onset. Several lines of evidence suggest that both beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors may prevent or inhibit the atrial electrical remodeling that allows AF to become established and maintained. Withdrawal of these medications may be associated with increased risk of AF in individuals at risk. Genetic polymorphisms that promote thrombosis are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis, and in some studies, with arterial thrombosis including stroke or myocardial infarction. Although several recently published trials indicate that warfarin or aspirin treatment of patients with AF decreases the risk of stroke, little is known about the risk of stroke as a complication of AF in relation to genetic variants that affect clotting.


The main tasks of the case-control study are: 1) identification of cases with incident AF and controls; 2) review of outpatient and inpatient medical records to assess eligibility and collect information on risk factors and medical history; 3) classification of medication use over time; 4) for AF patients, telephone interview and collection of blood samples; 5) blood specimen processing, DNA extraction, and genotyping; and 6) data analysis of the associations of medication use and genotype with AF onset and stroke complications.

Study Type : Observational
Study Start Date : July 2002
Primary Completion Date : June 2008
Study Completion Date : June 2008

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

U.S. FDA Resources

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
No eligibility criteria

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its identifier (NCT number): NCT00021905

Sponsors and Collaborators
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
OverallOfficial: Susan Heckbert University of Washington

Publications: Identifier: NCT00021905     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 974
First Posted: August 10, 2001    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 24, 2008
Last Verified: July 2008

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Arrhythmias, Cardiac
Pathologic Processes
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Vascular Diseases