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Genetics of CVD Risk Factors in Samoans

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005528
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: May 13, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  Purpose
To evaluate the role of known genes involved in lipid metabolism on serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels in Samoans residing in American and Western Samoa, who were exposed to the biobehavioral changes of modernization.

Condition
Cardiovascular Diseases Heart Diseases Obesity Atherosclerosis

Study Type: Observational

Further study details as provided by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI):

Study Start Date: April 1995
Study Completion Date: February 2000
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

Modernizing Samoans are characterized by high levels of certain cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as extreme adiposity and high prevalences of obesity and hypertension. However, lipid levels in Samoans such as total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are not consistent with their obesity and not always consistent with ecological measures of modernization.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The cross-sectional study used serum lipid and lipoprotein and dietary data collected in 1994 and 1995 in American and Western Samoa to compare the American and Western Samoans. Quantitative determinations were made of lipid and apolipoprotein levels differences between the two groups. Estimates were made of the effects of dietary intake, body size, and smoking on lipid and apolipoproteins. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on genetic factors influencing lipid and lipoprotein levels. Statistical analyses were conducted to test hypotheses about gene-environment interactions and gene-gene interactions in polynesians from American Samoa and Western Samoa.

Diet, physical activity and body size vary with exposure to the influences of economic modernization and the adoption of non-traditional behaviors. Although adiposity and its central distribution, insulin, blood pressure and dietary cholesterol increase from Western Samoa to American Samoa, saturated fat intakes due to coconuts and cigarette smoking are greater in Western Samoa. Thus, modernization does not produce simple unilineal changes in risk factors. The investigators examined very specific hypotheses, based on the cross-sectional data collected in 1994 and 1995, about the influence of genes on lipids, about genetic interactions on lipids and about concrete environmental and specific gene interactions on lipid outcomes.

The study completion date listed in this record was obtained from the "End Date" entered in the Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS) record.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
No eligibility criteria
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00005528


Sponsors and Collaborators
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Investigators
OverallOfficial: Mohammad Kamboh University of Pittsburgh
  More Information

Publications:

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005528     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 5060
R01HL052611 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: May 25, 2000
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: May 13, 2016
Last Verified: August 2004

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Atherosclerosis
Arteriosclerosis
Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Vascular Diseases