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Primary Prevention of CHD Risk Factors Occurring in US

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005495
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: May 13, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  Purpose
To evaluate the effectiveness of primary prevention of coronary heart disease risk factors by examining data from the National Health Examination Survey (NHES) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) to determine whether more recent birth cohorts were attaining lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels than earlier birth cohorts.

Condition
Cardiovascular Diseases Heart Diseases Coronary Heart Disease Risk Reduction Coronary Disease Hypertension Hypercholesterolemia

Study Type: Observational

Further study details as provided by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI):

Study Start Date: July 1998
Study Completion Date: June 1999
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

The coronary heart disease risk factor profile of Americans has been improving, with decreasing blood pressure and cholesterol levels. However, it is not apparent whether this improvement is due to primary prevention of risk factors through lifestyle choices or to secondary prevention (management) of established risk factors. Since secondary prevention only targets people with high blood pressure or cholesterol levels, the effect should be demonstrated by temporal declines in the upper percentiles (75th, 90th) of the blood pressure and cholesterol distributions. Primary prevention should shift the entire risk factor distribution, including the percentiles in the middle (50th) and lower (10th, 25th) portions of the distribution. Thus, the effectiveness of primary prevention programs can be evaluated by examining temporal changes in the middle and lower percentiles, and the effectiveness of secondary prevention can be evaluated by examining temporal changes in the higher percentiles.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

Data from the National Health Examination Survey and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were examined to determine whether more recent birth cohorts were attaining lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels than earlier birth cohorts. The results of these analyses provided information that may help guide further research and application of population prevention strategies.

The study completion date listed in this record was obtained from the "End Date" entered in the Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS) record.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
No eligibility criteria
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00005495


Sponsors and Collaborators
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Investigators
OverallOfficial: David Goff, Jr. Wake Forest University
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005495     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 5013
R03HL058697 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: May 25, 2000
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: May 13, 2016
Last Verified: November 2002

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Hypercholesterolemia
Coronary Disease
Coronary Artery Disease
Myocardial Ischemia
Hyperlipidemias
Dyslipidemias
Lipid Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Arteriosclerosis
Arterial Occlusive Diseases