Mechanisms Underlying Abnormal Ambulatory BP Patterns

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005346
First received: May 25, 2000
Last updated: May 12, 2016
Last verified: November 2001
  Purpose
To understand the mechanism(s) underlying sodium-dependent blood pressure control, and to determine the consequences thereof.

Condition
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Hypertension

Study Type: Observational

Further study details as provided by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI):

Study Start Date: January 1993
Study Completion Date: December 1995
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

The blood pressure of a significant percentage of the hypertensive population, and the normotensive population at a high risk for the development of hypertension (Blacks and older individuals), is sodium (salt)-dependent. That is to say, increasing the intake of salt will increase blood pressure in these individuals; conversely, and more importantly, decreasing the intake of salt will reduce blood pressure.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The investigators believed that the mechanisms responsible for sodium-dependent blood pressure were only indirectly linked to race, sex, and age. Their research was consistent with the hypothesis that sodium-dependent blood pressure control resulted from decreased responsiveness of the renal and adrenal blood pressure regulatory systems. This produced abnormal daily blood pressure patterns, with reduced fluctuation resulting in extended periods of increased blood pressure. The increased cardiovascular load led to the early development of cardiovascular and renal disease, including hypertension. They tested this hypothesis by identifying 'high risk' and 'normal risk' subjects based on renal responses to sodium restriction. The subjects were equal numbers of healthy males and females, Blacks and whites, between the ages of 55-70 years. Using an innovative approach, they then examined the influence of risk status on 24-hour patterns of blood pressure, hormonal activity, and sodium handling. Finally, they determined the clinical significance of the profiles by examining changes in cardiac and renal status at a two-year follow-up.

The study completion date listed in this record was obtained from the "End Date" entered in the Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS) record.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
No eligibility criteria
  Contacts and Locations
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No Contacts or Locations Provided
  More Information

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005346     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 4215  R01HL046177 
Study First Received: May 25, 2000
Last Updated: May 12, 2016
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2016