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Issues Surrounding Prenatal Genetic Testing for Achondroplasia

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00001536
First Posted: December 10, 2002
Last Update Posted: March 4, 2008
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
  Purpose
Since the gene responsible for achondroplasia was identified in 1994, it has become possible to test for achondroplasia prenatally. Moreover, prenatal genetic testing for achondroplasia is relatively simple and is highly likely to be informative for any couple seeking testing. Four diagnostic laboratories in the U.S. are currently performing prenatal genetic testing for achondroplasia. Before prenatal genetic testing for achondroplasia becomes more widely available, however, it is essential that we learn more about the lives of affected individuals and their families, the implications of offering testing for achondroplasia, and the education and the counseling needs of this community. Personal interviews and stories have been published and discussed at national meetings (Ablon 1984). We conducted a pilot telephone interview survey of 15 individuals with achondroplasia. What is needed now is a large scale quantitative study of the community of little people and their families. To meet this need, we have developed a survey tool to analyze family relationships, quality of life, tendencies toward optimism or pessimism, information-avoiding or information-seeking behaviors, social support, involvement in Little People of America Inc. (LPA), self-esteem, sociodemographics and views on achondroplasia, religiousness, reproductive and family plans, genetic testing, and abortion. The self-administered survey will be completed nationally by a sample of persons with achondroplasia and their family members.

Condition
Achondroplasia Dwarfism

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: Issues Surrounding Prenatal Genetic Testing for Achondroplasia

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 2000
Study Start Date: August 1996
Estimated Study Completion Date: July 2000
Detailed Description:
Since the gene responsible for achondroplasia was identified in 1994, it has become possible to test for achondroplasia prenatally. Moreover, prenatal genetic testing for achondroplasia is relatively simple and is highly likely to be informative for any couple seeking testing. Four diagnostic laboratories in the U.S. are currently performing prenatal genetic testing for achondroplasia. Before prenatal genetic testing for achondroplasia becomes more widely available, however, it is essential that we learn more about the lives of affected individuals and their families, the implications of offering testing for achondroplasia, and the education and the counseling needs of this community. Personal interviews and stories have been published and discussed at national meetings (Ablon 1984). We conducted a pilot telephone interview survey of 15 individuals with achondroplasia. What is needed now is a large scale quantitative study of the community of little people and their families. To meet this need, we have developed a survey tool to analyze family relationships, quality of life, tendencies toward optimism or pessimism, information-avoiding or information-seeking behaviors, social support, involvement in Little People of America Inc. (LPA), self-esteem, sociodemographics and views on achondroplasia, religiousness, reproductive and family plans, genetic testing, and abortion. The self-administered survey will be completed nationally by a sample of persons with achondroplasia and their family members.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Adult individuals of either gender with achondroplasia and their first degree relatives (both short and average statured) of all ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

No short-statured persons with conditions other than achondroplasia.

No average-statured family members of short statured persons with conditions other than achondroplasia.

No minors less than 18 years of age.

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00001536


Locations
United States, Maryland
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00001536     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 960123
96-HG-0123
First Submitted: November 3, 1999
First Posted: December 10, 2002
Last Update Posted: March 4, 2008
Last Verified: August 1999

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Disability
Dwarfism
Ethics in Genetic Counseling
Quality of Life
Reproductive Issues
Support Groups
Achondroplasia

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Dwarfism
Achondroplasia
Bone Diseases, Developmental
Bone Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Endocrine System Diseases
Osteochondrodysplasias