Warm Homes for Elder New Zealanders (WHEZ)

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified June 2012 by University of Otago.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Health Research Council, New Zealand
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Philippa Howden-Chapman, University of Otago
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01627418
First received: August 2, 2011
Last updated: June 20, 2012
Last verified: June 2012
  Purpose

Aim

The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether fuel subsidies reduce exacerbations of COPD among people aged over 55, and therefore whether providing such subsidies is a cost-beneficial policy initiative.

The Warm Homes for Elder New Zealanders Study is enrolling community-dwelling people aged over 55 with moderate or worse COPD. Prior to the study commencing the houses will be insulated (if physically feasible, & the house-owner agrees). Data are being collected on the health and energy use of the participants.

The households randomly assigned to the "early" intervention group will have a subsidy to their power account their first winter in the study. The subsidy is the intervention and will enable the participants, if they chose to do so, to keep their house warmer during the winter.


Condition Intervention
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Behavioral: Energy Voucher
Behavioral: No intervention : control arm

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Warm Homes for Elder New Zealanders: a Community Trial of People With COPD

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Otago:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Moderate or severe exacerbations of COPD during winter for which hospitalisation, systemic corticosteroids and/or antibiotics are required to treat the exacerbation [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Severe exacerbations of COPD during winter for which hospitalisation is required to treat the exacerbation [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Moderate exacerbations of COPD during winter; which will be defined as requiring treatment with systemic corticosteroids and/or antibiotics [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • All-cause hospitalisation during winter [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Temperature in the living and bedrooms during winter [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Electricity usage during winter [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Costs to health care system of index participant during winter [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Self-reported quality of life for index participant during winter [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Respiratory health of other people living in household during winter [ Time Frame: Four months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Any changes in index participant baseline lung function [ Time Frame: course of study ( up to 18 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Study withdrawals due to death or greater dependency [ Time Frame: course of study (up to 18 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Support person burden [ Time Frame: course of study (up to 18 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 600
Study Start Date: April 2009
Estimated Study Completion Date: November 2012
Estimated Primary Completion Date: November 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Voucher
Receive the intervention the first winter enrolled in the study. The intervention is a electricity voucher and a short pamphlet describing how to work out how much heat the voucher can buy.
Behavioral: Energy Voucher
Receive the intervention the first winter enrolled in the study. The intervention is a electricity voucher and a short pamphlet describing how to work out how much heat the voucher can buy.
No Intervention: Control
Receive the intervention the second winter enrolled in the study. The intervention is a electricity voucher and a short pamphlet describing how to work out how much heat the voucher can buy.
Behavioral: No intervention : control arm
Do not receive the money or pamphlet in the initial study year

Detailed Description:

Warm Homes for Elder New Zealanders (WHEZ)

Background Although there has been considerable recent work on the prevention, management and causes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the contribution of housing has not been well researched. This is despite the socio-economic patterning of COPD (Maori women have the highest rate of COPD that has been recorded for any group of women), and the relationship between socio-economic deprivation and housing conditions.

It is likely that improved heating would reduce exacerbations of COPD as:

  • COPD patients with the most advanced disease tend to be older people who often live on a fixed income and may be unable to afford adequate heating
  • There is a high excess of winter hospitalisations in COPD patients indicating COPD exacerbations may be triggered by cold conditions.
  • About one third of exacerbations of COPD are triggered by respiratory infections.
  • The Housing, Insulation and Health Study demonstrated a reduction in self-reported respiratory disease after houses were insulated. Therefore improving the heating in households with a COPD patient may reduce respiratory infections and this in turn would reduce the number and severity of exacerbations.

The percentage of people over 65 in New Zealand will increase from 12% to 22% over the next 25 years. Therefore it will become increasingly important to find cost-effective ways of reducing the morbidity of the older age group. As COPD is a significant cause of morbidity amongst older people, this study investigates a potentially cost effective intervention to reduce both the likelihood of expensive hospital stays and improve the quality of life for older people.

Aim To evaluate whether fuel subsidies reduce exacerbations of COPD among people aged over 55, and therefore whether providing such subsidies is a cost-beneficial policy initiative.

Potential Benefits The potential benefits of the study include reducing the burden of disease. The patients and their caregivers may experience improved quality of life. Hospitals may experience fewer patients requiring treatment during the winter. A cost-benefit analysis will quantify the benefits.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   55 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Post Bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio < Lower Limit of Normal (NHanesIII)
  • Post Bronchodilator FEV1 < 80% of the predicted FEV1 (NHanesIII)

OR - In the last three years either went to hospital for their COPD or took antibiotics/steriods for their COPD

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Not planning to stay in the same dwelling until the end of the study
  • Does not want to take part in research
  • Unwilling to answer inclusion questionnaire
  • Unable to communicate effectively
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01627418

Locations
New Zealand
Christchurch
Christchurch, New Zealand
Wanganui / Manawatu
Wanganui, New Zealand
Wellington / Hutt/ Porirua
Wellington, New Zealand
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Otago
Health Research Council, New Zealand
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Philippa L Howden-Chapman, PhD University of Otago
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided by University of Otago

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Philippa Howden-Chapman, Professor, University of Otago
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01627418     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HRC08/072AR
Study First Received: August 2, 2011
Last Updated: June 20, 2012
Health Authority: New Zealand: Health Research Council

Keywords provided by University of Otago:
COPD
CORD
COAD

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Lung Diseases
Respiration Disorders
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Respiratory Tract Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 29, 2014