Mothers and Girls Dancing Together Trial (MAGNET)

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified January 2013 by University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sofiya Alhassan, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01588379
First received: April 25, 2012
Last updated: January 30, 2013
Last verified: January 2013
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week afterschool afro-centric dance physical activity program for daughters and mothers on the physical activity level of African-American girls.


Condition Intervention
Physical Activity
Behavioral: Girls and mothers Afro-centric dance program
Behavioral: Girls, alone
Other: Newsletter

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Effects of an Afro-centric Dance Program for African-American Daughters and Mothers

Further study details as provided by University of Massachusetts, Amherst:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change from baseline in physical activity level at 12-weeks [ Time Frame: Baseline, 6-weeks and 12-weeks after study initiation ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Changes in body mass index, fasting insulin, and psychosocial [ Time Frame: Baseline and 12-weeks after the initiation of the study protocol ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 99
Study Start Date: January 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date: November 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: July 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Girls and mothers dance together
African-American girls AND their mom's will participate in the Afro-centric dance program together and also receive weekly newsletter that focuses on health related issues.
Behavioral: Girls and mothers Afro-centric dance program
African-American girls and their mom's will participate in an after school Afro-centric dance program for 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Both girls and the mothers will also receive weekly newsletter containing various health information.
Other Name: Girls and mothers, together
Experimental: Girls, alone
African-American girls will participate in the Afro-centric dance program alone. Girls and mom's will receive weekly newsletter that focuses on health related issues
Behavioral: Girls, alone
African-American girls (without their mom's) will participate in an after school Afro-centric dance program for 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Both girls and the mothers will also receive weekly newsletter containing various health information.
Other Name: Girls, alone
Active Comparator: No dancing
African-American girls and their mom's will only receive weekly newsletter that focuses on health related issues.
Other: Newsletter
Both girls and the mothers will receive weekly newsletter containing various health information.
Other Name: Control

Detailed Description:

Like African-American women, African-American girls suffer disproportionately from obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. One factor strongly associated with the development of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus disparities in children is low physical activity levels. Low physical activity is more prevalent in African-American girls, pointing to the critical need for effective physical activity interventions. For a physical activity intervention message to be effective among African-American girls, the program must be enjoyable and tailored to African-American girls and women. One possibility for an appropriate physical activity intervention is afro-centric dance, which has strong cultural and historical significance in the African-American community. This form of physical activity may provide girls with sustained bouts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. There appears to be a strong positive correlation between parental and children physical activity levels. In the African-American culture, maternal health behaviors in particular have a strong influence on children's health behaviors. Currently, there are no studies that examine the effects of a daughter-mother Afro-centric dance program on the physical activity levels of African-American girls. Therefore, the purpose of this study will be to examine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week physical activity intervention consisting of afro-centric dance and its ability to affect the physical activity levels of African-American girls. If investigators identify afro-centric dance as a sustainable form of physical activity for African-American daughters and mothers, investigators can use this intervention to significantly reduce obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus in these groups.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   7 Years to 11 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria for Girls:

  • 7 -10 yrs old on the date of randomization
  • Defined as African-American if her parent/guardian identifies her as such
  • No inclusion criteria will be used for mothers

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unable to wear the activity monitor
  • Unable to participate in physical activity, require oxygen supplementation for exertion, have a developmental or physical disability preventing participation, cannot increase their physical activity for any reason, uncorrected structural heart disease)
  • If girl and/or mother is unable to read, understand, or complete the informed consent or surveys in English.
  • Musculoskeletal injuries or disorders that would prevent participation
  • Taking diabetes (type 1 or 2), renal diseases, eating disorder, pregnancy medication
  • Take medications affecting growth (e.g., insulin, oral hypoglycemic, thyroid hormone)
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01588379

Contacts
Contact: Sofiya Alhassan, PhD 413-545-3475 alhassan@kin.umass.edu

Locations
United States, Massachusetts
Organizations, Churches, and Elementary Schools Recruiting
Springfield, Massachusetts, United States, 01103
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Sofiya Alhassan, PhD University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Sofiya Alhassan, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01588379     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2010-0804
Study First Received: April 25, 2012
Last Updated: January 30, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014