Effects of Thoracic Mobilization on Shoulder Range of Motion

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Creighton University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01518504
First received: December 1, 2011
Last updated: November 19, 2012
Last verified: November 2012
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of thoracic spine joint manipulation versus a sham intervention on active and passive shoulder flexion (elevation), external rotation, and internal rotation range of motion.


Condition Intervention
Shoulder Range of Motion in Healthy Individuals
Other: Thoracic Mobilization
Other: Sham

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effects of Thoracic Mobilization on Shoulder Range of Motion

Further study details as provided by Creighton University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Changes in Shoulder Range of motion [ Time Frame: Single Study Visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    To determine changes in shoulder active and passive range of motion following one of two intervention protocols. Changes will be measured by examining shoulder range of motion in three directions: Shoulder flexion, internal rotation and external rotation.

    We hypothesize that the use of a thoracic spine joint manipulation will increase shoulder range of motion in flexion (elevation) as well as external and internal rotation to a greater degree than a sham mobilization.



Enrollment: 40
Study Start Date: December 2011
Study Completion Date: June 2012
Primary Completion Date: June 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Thoracic Mobilization
The subject will be in a prone position and the physical therapist will first identify the upper thoracic spine region. The physical therapist will then cross his or her hands and place them on opposite sides of the spinous processes using the pisiforms as the contact area. The subject will be asked to exhale and upon exhalation the physical therapist will apply a small amplitude, quick thrust at end of range.
Other: Thoracic Mobilization
The subject will be in a prone position and the physical therapist will first identify the upper thoracic spine region. The physical therapist will then cross his or her hands and place them on opposite sides of the spinous processes using the pisiforms as the contact area. The subject will be asked to exhale and upon exhalation the physical therapist will apply a small amplitude, quick thrust at end of range.
Other Names:
  • manipulation
  • Grade V joint mobilization
  • small amplitude, quick thrust mobilization/manipulation
Sham Comparator: Sham
The subject will be in a prone position and the physical therapist will first identify the upper thoracic spine region. The physical therapist will then cross his or her hands and place them on opposite sides of the spinous processes using the pisiforms as the contact area. The subject will be asked to exhale and upon exhalation the physical therapist will not apply any other force than light hand contact.
Other: Sham
The subject will be in a prone position and the physical therapist will first identify the upper thoracic spine region. The physical therapist will then cross his or her hands and place them on opposite sides of the spinous processes using the pisiforms as the contact area. The subject will be asked to exhale and upon exhalation the physical therapist will not apply any other force than light hand contact.

Detailed Description:

Many individuals who have a primary complaint of shoulder pain often demonstrate deficits in glenohumeral and scapulothoracic mobility. Typically individuals will have limitations in shoulder range of motion, specifically, flexion (elevation) as well as external and internal rotation. Although the glenohumeral joint is the primary joint for shoulder motion adjacent joints such as the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, scapulothoracic, and thoracic spine also contribute to maximal shoulder motion. Limited shoulder motion may be a result of joint hypomobility, muscle inhibition, or pain. Typically interventions such as stretching and joint mobilization/manipulation are directed at the glenohumeral joint to improve shoulder motion, but little is known about interventions targeting adjacent sites which may also improve shoulder range of motion. This study will evaluate the effect of thoracic spine joint manipulation on active and passive shoulder range of motion.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   19 Years to 45 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults 19-45 years

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Individuals who are pregnant
  • History of cervical or thoracic surgery
  • Bone or joint disease
  • Current infection or tumor
  • Osteopenia/osteoporosis
  • Spinal fracture
  • Rheumatologic pathologies
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01518504

Locations
United States, Nebraska
Creighton University
Omaha, Nebraska, United States, 68178
Sponsors and Collaborators
Creighton University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Terry L Grindstaff, PHD,PT,ATC Creighton University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Creighton University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01518504     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 11-16286
Study First Received: December 1, 2011
Last Updated: November 19, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Creighton University:
Thoracic
Manipulation
Manual Therapy
Mobilization
Shoulder
Range of Motion

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 21, 2014