Longitudinal Pediatric Palliative Care: Quality of Life & Spiritual Struggle (FACE)

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Johns Hopkins University
University of Miami
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Maureen Lyon, Children's Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01289444
First received: January 28, 2011
Last updated: September 8, 2014
Last verified: October 2012
  Purpose

Our goal is to advance palliative care to adolescents and their families. We hope our study will decrease suffering (psychological, spiritual, physical) and increase quality of life (QOL). Left unprepared for end-of-life decisions, miscommunication and disagreements may result in families being charged with neglect or court battles over treatment choices. FAmily CEntered (FACE) Advance Care Planning helps prepare adolescents with HIV/AIDS and their families for future medical decisions. We hope to increase families' understanding of their teens' wishes for end-of-life care and to decrease conflict. We will also study communication and spiritual struggle Families will be randomized into the either the Control (N=65 families) or FACE Intervention (N=65 families). FACE families will meet with a trained/certified researcher for three 60- to 90-minute sessions scheduled one week apart: Session 1: Lyon Advance Care Planning Survey© - Adolescent and Surrogate Versions: Session 2: The Respecting Choices Interview® Session 3: Completion of The Five Wishes©. Control families will also meet with a researcher for three 60-to 90-minute sessions scheduled one week apart: Session 1: Developmental History, Session 2: Safety Tips, and Session 3: Nutrition. Questionnaires will be administered five times, when first seen, at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months from the time of Session 3. Hypothesis 1: Compared to an active control, FACE will relieve psychological suffering by 1) increasing congruence in treatment preferences between teens with AIDS and their surrogates, 2) decreasing decisional conflict regarding EOL decision making for future medical treatment in adolescents with AIDS; 3) increasing quality communication about EOL care in adolescent/legal guardian or surrogate dyads; 4) and maximizing QOL.

Hypothesis 2: In addition to the direct effects, FACE will also indirectly affect QOL through dimensions of threat appraisal.

Hypothesis 3: FACE will have stronger effects on the QOL measures among patients who have less spiritual struggle.

Hypothesis 4: Spiritual struggle has both direct and indirect effects on hospitalization/dialysis use. FACE will also affect hospitalization/dialysis use indirectly through threat appraisal and HAART adherence.


Condition Intervention
HIV
Behavioral: FAmily CEntered (FACE) ACP
Behavioral: Healthy Living Control

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Longitudinal Pediatric Palliative Care: Quality of Life & Spiritual Struggle

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Children's Research Institute:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • congruence in treatment preferences [ Time Frame: Change from baseline in Congruence in Treament Preferences at 18 months post-intervention compared to control ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measured by the Statement of Treatment Preferences


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • QOL [ Time Frame: Change from baseline in Quality of Life at 18 months post-intervention compared to control ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measured by score on Varni's Peds QoL

  • Utilization of hospitalization [ Time Frame: Change from baseline in hospitalizations at 18 month follow-up post intervention compared to control ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Hospitalization will be measured by chart review. Each site has hospital based services for patient population

  • Utilization of dialysis [ Time Frame: Change from baseline in use of dialysis at 18 month post-intervention compared to control ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Use of dialysis will be measured by chart review.


Estimated Enrollment: 260
Study Start Date: June 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: June 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: January 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Healthy Living Control

Session 1. Developmental History. Goal: To take a non-medical developmental history. The RA-Control will conduct the session in a structured interview format. Administered, with all medical questions removed to prevent any risk of contamination with the experimental condition.

Session 2. Safety Tips. Goal: To provide safety information using the American Academy of Pediatrics Bright Futures counseling guides. Participants will be asked questions about seat belt use, etc. Safety information will be provided.

Session 3. Nutrition Tips. Goal: To provide safety information using the American Academy of Pediatrics Bright Futures nutrition/counseling guides. The Administered by the trained RA-Control to prevent contamination with the FACE condition.

Behavioral: Healthy Living Control

Active Comparator: Three 60 to 90 minute sessions scheduled one week apart. 1. Developmental History. Goal: To take a non-medical developmental history. The RA-Control will conduct the session in a structured interview format. Administered with all medical questions removed to prevent any risk of contamination with the experimental condition. 2. Safety Tips. Goal: To provide safety information using the American Academy of Pediatrics Bright Futures counseling guides. Participants will be asked questions about seat belt use, etc. Safety information will be provided.

3. Nutrition Tips. Goal: To provide safety information using the American Academy of Pediatrics Bright Futures nutrition/counseling guides.

Other Name: HLC
Experimental: FAmily CEntered (FACE) ACP
Three-60 to 90 minute sessions scheduled one week apart: 1) To assess values, spiritual and other beliefs, and life experiences with illness and EOL care & when to initiate advance care planning. 2) To facilitate conversations and shared decision-making between the adolescent and guardian/surrogate about palliative care & prepare the surrogate to be able to fully represent the adolescent's wishes. 3) Which person the teen wants to make health care decisions for him/her; The kind of medical treatment the teen wants; How comfortable the teen wants to be; How the teen wants people to treat him/her; What teen wants loved ones to know; Any spiritual or religious concerns teens may have.
Behavioral: FAmily CEntered (FACE) ACP
Three-60 to 90 minute sessions scheduled one week apart: 1) To assess values, spiritual and other beliefs, and life experiences with illness and EOL care & when to initiate advance care planning. 2) To facilitate conversations and shared decision-making between the adolescent and guardian/surrogate about palliative care & prepare the surrogate to be able to fully represent the adolescent's wishes. 3) Which person the teen wants to make health care decisions for him/her; The kind of medical treatment the teen wants; How comfortable the teen wants to be; How the teen wants people to treat him/her; What teen wants loved ones to know; Any spiritual or religious concerns teens may have.
Other Name: FACE

Detailed Description:

Our goal is to advance palliative care with children and their families aimed at relieving suffering (psychological, spiritual, physical) and maximizing quality of life. Left unprepared for end-of-life decisions, miscommunication and disagreements may result in families being charged with neglect, court battles and even legislative intervention. We propose building on our R34, evidence based model, the Family Centered (FACE) Advance Care Planning intervention, to test our full theoretical model examining the putative mediators and moderators, and spiritual struggle (negative religious coping) with a sicker group and adolescents with AIDS in an adequately powered randomized, clinical, 2-arm, controlled trial. FACE is a culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate, manualized family intervention based on transactional stress and coping theory, which prepares adolescents with HIV/AIDS and their families for end-of-life decision-making through problem solving. Theoretically, threat appraisal is related to Lazarus' concept of primary appraisal, particularly the way in which an event threatens the child's goals or values. Spiritual struggle (negative religious coping) may be a source of distress, causing disparities in palliative care and outcomes. We will test the efficacy of the FACE intervention for increasing communication and congruence in end-of-life treatment preferences between teens with AIDS and their surrogates, and determine if increased congruence can be maintained over time. We will also examine the impact of the FACE intervention on decisional conflict, quality of communication, and patient quality of life. We will also evaluate hypothesized mediators (threat appraisal, HAART adherence) and moderator (spiritual struggle) of study outcomes, including hospitalizations. We will recruit from hospital-based clinics and randomize 130 adolescent/surrogate dyads (N=260 subjects) to either Control (N=65 dyads) or FACE Intervention (N=65 dyads). Participants with HIV dementia, severe depression, suicidality or homicidality or in foster care will not be allowed to participate. Three 60- to 90-minute sessions will be conducted with a certified interviewer at weekly intervals: FACE: Session 1: Lyon Advance Care Planning Survey© - Adolescent and Surrogate Versions: Session 2: The Respecting Choices Interview® Session 3: Completion of The Five Wishes©. Control will also be administered in a family group format to control for time, attention, and Hawthorn effects: Session 1: Developmental History, Session 2: Safety Tips, and Session 3: Safety Tips. Standardized self-report measures will be administered at baseline, immediate post intervention (3 month), and 6, 12 and 18 month post intervention. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) will assess outcomes.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years to 21 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Adolescent Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosed ever with HIV;
  • All ethnic groups;
  • Knows HIV status;
  • Speaks English;
  • Absence of active homicidality or suicidality;
  • Absence of HIV dementia;
  • IQ >69;
  • Consent from the legal guardian for adolescents aged 14-17;
  • Consent from the surrogate for adolescents aged 18-21;
  • Assent from adolescent aged 14-17;
  • Consent from adolescent aged 18-21;
  • Absence of severe depression;
  • Not in foster care

Legal Guardian Inclusion Criteria for Legal Guardians of Adolescents Age 14-17:

  • Adolescent willingness to discuss problems related to HIV/AIDS with them;
  • Age 18 or older;
  • Ability to speak English;
  • Absence of active homicidality, suicidality, or psychosis;
  • Absence of HIV dementia;
  • Legal guardian;
  • Consent to participate; Consent for his/her adolescent to participate;
  • Knows HIV status of adolescent;
  • Absence of depression in the severe range;

Surrogate Inclusion Criteria for Adolescents Age 18-21:

  • Selected by adolescent aged 18 to 21;
  • Age 18 or older;
  • Willingness to discuss problems related to HIV and end-of-life;
  • Absence of active homicidality, suicidality, or psychosis;
  • Absence of HIV dementia;
  • Speaks English;
  • Consent to participate;
  • Knows HIV status of adolescent.
  • Absence of severe depression;

Exclusion Criteria:

  • adolescent or surrogate does not know HIV diagnosis
  • being in foster care
  • developmentally delayed
  • scoring below the cut off on the HIV Dementia Scale
  • scoring above the cut off for depressive symptoms on the Beck Depression Inventory
  • homicidal, suicidal or psychotic on screening
  • does not speak English
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01289444

Locations
United States, District of Columbia
Children's National Medical Center
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, 22314
United States, Florida
Univeristy of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Miami, Florida, United States, 33136
United States, Tennessee
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis, Tennessee, United States, 38105
Sponsors and Collaborators
Children's Research Institute
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Johns Hopkins University
University of Miami
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Maureen E Lyon, PhD Children's Research Institute
  More Information

Publications:
Lyon ME, Garvie PA, Briggs L, He J, Malow R, D'Angelo LJ, McCarter R. Is it safe? Talking to teens with HIV/AIDS about death and dying: A 3-month evaluation of family centered (FACE) advance care planning - anxiety, depression quality of life. HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care 2, 1-11, 2010.
Lyon ME, Garvie PA, Briggs L, He J, D'Angelo LJ, McCarter R. (September, 2010 on line, in press). Does spirituality protect psychological adjustment, quality of life or medication adherence when talking to HIV+ Adolescents about death and dying? Journal of Adolescent Health.

Responsible Party: Maureen Lyon, Principal Investigator, Children's Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01289444     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1R01NR012711-01
Study First Received: January 28, 2011
Last Updated: September 8, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Children's Research Institute:
palliative care
AIDS
adolescents
quality of life
adherence
spiritual
threat appraisal
treatment congruence
treatment preferences
dialysis
hospitalization
communication
family intervention
Family Centered Advance Care Planning
decision making
advance care planning
end of life

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 23, 2014