Molecular Immunohematology in Ethiopian Sub-Populations

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified December 2013 by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01282021
First received: January 21, 2011
Last updated: March 14, 2014
Last verified: December 2013
  Purpose

Alloimmunization to blood products in transfused patients is a recognized management challenge in the clinical setting. In particular the ethnic and racial specificity of RBC antigens and the limited availability of matched healthy volunteer blood donors have intensified the dilemma. The presence of low prevalence clinically significant RBC antigens among minorities account for the higher rate of alloimmunization observed in patients from this group. This is partly due to the racial and ethnic differences between the blood donor and recipient populations in the US.

The increasing number of new Ethiopian-American immigrants in the US presenting to the health care system with blood transfusion requirements makes understanding the unique transfusion needs of this minority population imperative. Although the majority of African Americans claim origin to West Africa, Ethiopians, being from East Africa, represent a rapidly growing population in the United States. Furthermore, identifying genetic similarities and disparities to their West African counterparts will certainly have clinical implications in terms of transfusion support and disease modifiers. This additional information would help in understanding the natural history and transfusion requirements of certain debilitating diseases, such as Sickle Cell Disease, which are known to occur more commonly in African Americans. Identifying ethnically and racially similar individuals could assist in recruiting healthy volunteer donors with similar RBC antigen profiles potentially supplementing the rare donor pool.

Although extensive archeological and sporadic serologic RBC antigen studies have been conducted in Ethiopia there are no population wide RBC antigen molecular studies. Our study population is selected by altitude and migration history. Ethiopia being in close proximity to Red Sea in the northeast, Indian Ocean in the southeast and the rest of Africa in the south/west has diverse population.

The study is a population based analysis of genetic variation of blood group antigens in three distinct and conserved Ethiopian sub-populations. Statistical analysis using Chi-square tests will be performed for each blood group antigen to detect differences in the distribution between the three sub-populations. The investigators will travel to Ethiopia to collect blood samples which will be analyzed in DTM at NIH using the standard serologic methods and currently available molecular genotyping systems. Samples will also be stored for future high throughput sequencing analysis and other studies.

The study will be a systematic analysis of the distribution of blood group antigens in Ethiopian sub-populations. Furthermore, new variants could be detected allowing insight in correlations of particular genotypes and phenotypes.


Condition
Blood Group Antigens
Blood Grouping and Crossmatching

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Molecular Immunohematology in Ethiopian Sub-Populations

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 600
Study Start Date: January 2011
Detailed Description:

Alloimmunization to blood products in transfused patients is a recognized management challenge in the clinical setting. In particular the ethnic and racial specificity of RBC antigens and the limited availability of matched healthy volunteer blood donors have intensified the dilemma. The presence of low prevalence clinically significant RBC antigens among minorities account for the higher rate of alloimmunization observed in patients from this group. This is partly due to the racial and ethnic differences between the blood donor and recipient populations in the US.

The increasing number of new Ethiopian-American immigrants in the US presenting to the health care system with blood transfusion requirements makes understanding the unique transfusion needs of this minority population imperative. Although the majority of African Americans claim origin to West Africa, Ethiopians, being from East Africa, represent a rapidly growing population in the United States. Furthermore, identifying genetic similarities and disparities to their West African counterparts will certainly have clinical implications in terms of transfusion support and disease modifiers. This additional information would help in understanding the natural history and transfusion requirements of certain debilitating diseases, such as Sickle Cell Disease, which are known to occur more commonly in African Americans. Identifying ethnically and racially similar individuals could assist in recruiting healthy volunteer donors with similar RBC antigen profiles potentially supplementing the rare donor pool.

Although extensive archeological and sporadic serologic RBC antigen studies have been conducted in Ethiopia there are no population wide RBC antigen molecular studies. Our study population is selected by altitude and migration history. Ethiopia being in close proximity to Red Sea in the northeast, Indian Ocean in the southeast and the rest of Africa in the south/west has diverse population.

The study is a population based analysis of genetic variation of blood group antigens in three distinct and conserved Ethiopian sub-populations. Statistical analysis using Chi-square tests will be performed for each blood group antigen to detect differences in the distribution between the three sub-populations. The investigators will travel to Ethiopia to collect blood samples which will be analyzed in DTM at NIH using the standard serologic methods and currently available molecular genotyping systems. Samples will also be stored for future high throughput sequencing analysis and other studies.

The study will be a systematic analysis of the distribution of blood group antigens in Ethiopian sub-populations. Furthermore, new variants could be detected allowing insight in correlations of particular genotypes and phenotypes.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

Healthy Volunteers greater than or equal to 18 year of age. Volunteer healthy donors above the age of 18 years who have lived in the area since birth and are at least 6 or 7 generation from endogenous families in the region will be recruited. A detailed ancestral line of descent (pedigree) is not mandatory to the study and will not be performed. Individuals residing in rural regions are mostly conserved and it may be possible that some donors could be closely related. However to identify as diverse as possible potential blood donors and avoid dilution of ancestral genes blood samples will be collected from individuals known to reside in the region for generations and not known to be closely related. Donors will be recruited through the local schools, churches and community organizations. The oral consent will include a question where each donor will be asked if anyone in his/her family is also donating sample and if so how close is the relationship. Blood collection will be on first come, first served basis and each individual will be informed only one person among close relatives will be included in the study.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Individuals less than 18 years of age will be excluded from the study. The study is a population study and the information obtained from individuals above 18 years is not expected to be different from those who are under 18 years old. Also the need to involve adults to consent individuals under 18 years old would be complicated. All donors should be healthy volunteer individuals at the time of sample collection. Any potential donor with physical and mental disability, individuals with known infectious and/or non-infectious diseases and pregnant women are excluded from the study.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01282021

Contacts
Contact: Sherry Sheldon (301) 496-4506 ssheldon@mail.cc.nih.gov
Contact: Willy A Flegel, M.D. (301) 594-7401 bill.flegel@nih.gov

Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike Recruiting
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Contact: Sherry Sheldon    301-496-4506    ssheldon@mail.cc.nih.gov   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Willy A Flegel, M.D. National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01282021     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 999911086, 11-CC-N086
Study First Received: January 21, 2011
Last Updated: March 14, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
RBC Antigens
Molecular Typing
Ethiopian Sub-Populations
Immunohematology
Immune Response

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 26, 2014