Effects of Hatha Yoga on Chronic Neck Pain

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Universität Duisburg-Essen
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01171274
First received: July 23, 2010
Last updated: February 18, 2011
Last verified: February 2011
  Purpose

Hatha Yoga is a traditional system of exercises, used in India for the relief of painful condition since centuries and gaining more and more interest in Europe and the US. While studies have demonstrated benefits of Hatha Yoga for patients with chronic low back pain, no studies regarding chronic neck pain are available until now. The purpose of this study is to determine if Hatha Yoga can ameliorate chronic neck pain and related restrictions.


Condition Intervention
Neck Pain
Behavioral: Hatha Yoga
Behavioral: Information regarding exercises and behaviour

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Randomisierte Kontrollierte Studie Zum Einfluss Von Hatha Yoga Auf Sensorische Schwellen, Kinästhetik Und Körperbild Bei Patienten Mit Chronischen Nackenschmerzen

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Universität Duisburg-Essen:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Neck pain intensity (100mm visual analog scale) [ Time Frame: Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    100mm visual analog scale


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility [ Time Frame: Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    The ability to exactly relocate the head on the trunk in a self-chosen "neutral" forward-position after an active movement.

    according to: Revel M, Andre-Deshays C, Minguet M. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility in patients with cervical pain. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1991;72:288-91.


  • Active range of motion [ Time Frame: Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    6 movement directions (flexion, extension, rotation right/left, lateral flexion right/left)

  • Pain related to motion [ Time Frame: Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    100mm visual analog scale for 6 movement directions (flexion, extension, rotation right/left, lateral flexion right/left)

    according to: Irnich D, Behrens N, Molzen H, König A, Gleditsch J, Krauss M, Natalis M, Senn E, Beyer A, Schöps P. Randomised trial of acupuncture compared with conventional massage and "sham" laser acupuncture for treatment of chronic neck pain. BMJ. 2001 Jun 30;322(7302):1574-8.


  • Pressure pain threshold [ Time Frame: Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    Pressure pain threshold measured at two individual points at the neck: (1) at the point of maximal pain and (2) in the adjacent region, one to two cm outside the painful area. Furthermore, it is measured bilaterally at levator scapulae muscle, semispinalis capitis muscle and trapezius muscle and at both hands, serving as control sites.

    Measurement procedure according to the protocol of QST. Reference: Rolke R et al.. Quantitative sensory testing in the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS): standardized protocol and reference values. Pain 2006;123:231-243.


  • Neck disability index (NDI) [ Time Frame: Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The Neck Disability Index is an instrument to assess neck pain complaints. Reference: Vernon H, Mior S. The Neck Disability Index: a study of reliability and validity. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 1991;14:409-415.

  • SF-36 [ Time Frame: Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    The SF-36 is a short-form health survey consisting of 8 scales (physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, mental health) measuring functional health and well-being as well as a physical a and mental health component scores.

    Reference: Bullinger M, Kirchberger I. SF-36 Fragebogen zum Gesundheitszustand. Göttingen: Hogrefe, 1998.


  • Pain diary [ Time Frame: From Week 1 to Week 10 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    100mm visual analog scale for rating neck pain intensity each day


Enrollment: 58
Study Start Date: August 2010
Study Completion Date: December 2010
Primary Completion Date: December 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Hatha Yoga
  • 9 weeks of Hatha Yoga, designed for treating chronic neck pain, as a group intervention.
  • One class of 90 minutes per week, 10 minutes training at home each day.
Behavioral: Hatha Yoga
  • 9 weeks of Hatha Yoga, designed for treating chronic neck pain, as a group intervention.
  • One class of 90 minutes per week, 10 minutes training at home each day.
Active Comparator: Exercise information
  • 9 weeks of exercises practiced at home.
  • Patients receive detailed information regarding appropriate exercises and behaviour for chronic neck pain patients.
Behavioral: Information regarding exercises and behaviour
  • 9 weeks of exercises practiced at home.
  • Patients receive detailed information regarding appropriate exercises and behaviour for chronic neck pain patients.

Detailed Description:

Hatha Yoga is a traditional system of exercises, used in India for the relief of painful condition since centuries and gaining more and more interest in Europe and the US. The efficacy of Hatha Yoga for relieving chronic low back pain has been repeatedly demonstrated in clinical trials, while there are no studies in the literature regarding chronic neck pain. The aim of this study is to investigate, whether a 9 weeks-course of Hatha Yoga reduces subjective pain ratings and disability in patients suffering from chronic neck pain. Furthermore, as neck pain patients have been shown to suffer from impaired sensory processing and proprioception, along with restricted range of motion, the study aims to test if Hatha Yoga can improve these variables. Therefore, tests regarding cervicocephalic proprioception, active range of motion and the processing of mechanical, vibration and pain stimuli will be included.

58 patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain will be randomized to either Hatha Yoga group or control group, receiving information regarding exercises for chronic neck pain. The control group will be offered to take part in a Yoga class after the end of the study.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 60 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Chronic mechanical neck pain, at least 40 mm on the 100mm visual analog scale.
  • Pain for at least 3 months.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • radicular symptoms
  • congenital spine deformity
  • pregnancy
  • rheumatic diseases
  • oncologic diseases
  • other severe psychiatric or somatic comorbidity
  • recent invasive or surgical treatment of the spine
  • regularly yoga practice participation in other studies
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01171274

Locations
Germany
Kliniken Essen-Mitte, Knappschafts-Krankenhaus, Department for Internal and Integrative Medicine
Essen, Northrhine-Westphalia, Germany, 45276
Sponsors and Collaborators
Universität Duisburg-Essen
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Gustav J Dobos, MD, Universität Duisburg Essen, Chair of Complementary and Integrative Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01171274     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 10-4358
Study First Received: July 23, 2010
Last Updated: February 18, 2011
Health Authority: Germany: Ethics Commission

Keywords provided by Universität Duisburg-Essen:
neck pain
yoga
proprioception
sensory thresholds
randomized controlled trial

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Neck Pain
Pain
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 20, 2014