Pregabalin and Colonic Function

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Information provided by:
Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01094808
First received: March 24, 2010
Last updated: March 5, 2012
Last verified: March 2012
  Purpose

This study is being done to evaluate the effects of pregabalin, a drug approved for anticonvulsive therapy and for neuropathic pain, on colonic and sensory functions in healthy individuals.

The specific study hypotheses were as follows: 1) pregabalin increases sensation thresholds, decreases sensation ratings, and increases compliance in response to balloon distension in the colon; 2) pregabalin reduces colonic phasic and tonic motility in response to a standardized meal; and 3) sensation ratings are lower with higher colonic compliance.


Condition Intervention Phase
Healthy
Drug: Pregabalin
Drug: Placebo
Other: Bowel preparation
Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Pharmacodynamics Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Official Title: Effect of Pregabalin on Colonic Sensorimotor Function in Healthy Adults.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Mayo Clinic:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Sensory Threshold for Pain [ Time Frame: approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The sensory threshold for first perception of pain was measured by stepwise inflation of the balloon in increments of 4 mm Hg at 60 second intervals. The balloon was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon. During this assessment participants were asked to report when they had the first perception of pain. The investigator recorded the threshold pressure at which the participants reported this sensation.

  • Sensation Ratings for Pain and Gas at 30 mm Hg Distension Above Baseline Operating Pressure [ Time Frame: Approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The 30 mm Hg distension refers to inflation of the balloon placed in placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon. Pain and gas were individually measured by a 100 mm long Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The VAS does not have any pre-set marks between the extremes. For the pain VAS, 0 means no pain and 100 mm means extreme pain. For the gas VAS, 0 means no gas sensation and 100 mm means extreme gas sensation. The investigator measures the mark made by the participant in mm and records this for the value of either pain or gas.

  • Colonic Compliance [ Time Frame: Approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Colonic compliance is a measure of the "stiffness" of the colon, that is, what pressure was needed to reach half the maximum value of the colon. After the barostat balloon catheter was inserted in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon, the balloon was inflated. After an initial conditioning distension to 20 mm Hg, colonic compliance was measured by step-wise inflation with increments of 4 mm Hg. Colonic compliance was analyzed by a validated linear interpolation method. The pressure at half maximum volume serves as a summary of colonic compliance.

  • Postprandial Colonic Tone [Reported] as the Symmetric Percent [Change]in Baseline Colonic Barostat Balloon Volume [ Time Frame: The first 30 minutes postprandially, and preprandial (30 minutes) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The symmetric percent reduction in baseline colonic barostat balloon volume during the first 30 minutes postprandially (PP) corrected for the preprandial (30 min) tone, (symmetric percent change= 100*log_e[fasting/PP]). A positive symmetric percent change reflects a decrease in barostat balloon volume indicating a reduction in colonic tone. (The balloon was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon.)

  • Postprandial Motility Index Over 30 Minutes [ Time Frame: 30 minutes after the meal ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The first 30 minute postprandial motility index (MI), MI = log_e [(number of contractions * sum of amplitudes)+1]


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Sensory Threshold for Gas [ Time Frame: Approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The sensory threshold for first perception of gas was measured by stepwise inflation of the balloon in increments of 4 mm Hg at 60 second intervals. (The balloon was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon.) During this assessment participants were asked to report when they had the first perception of gas. The investigator recorded the threshold pressure at which the participants reported this sensation.

  • Sensation Ratings for Pain at 16, 24, and 36 mm Hg Distension [ Time Frame: Approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The mm Hg distensions refer to the barostat balloon, which was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon. Pain sensation was measured by a 100 mm long Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The VAS does not have any pre-set marks between the extremes. For the pain VAS, 0 means no pain and 100 mm means extreme pain. The investigator measures the mark made by the participant in mm and records this for the value of pain.

  • Sensation Ratings for Gas at 16, 24, and 36 mm Hg Distension [ Time Frame: Approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The mm Hg distensions refer to the barostat balloon, which was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon. Gas sensation was measured by a 100 mm long Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The VAS does not have any pre-set marks between the extremes. For the gas VAS, 0 means no gas sensation and 100 mm means extreme gas sensation. The investigator measures the mark made by the participant in mm and records this for the value of either pain or gas.

  • Gas Sensation Rating Averaged Across 4 Distension Pressures (16, 24, 30, and 36 mg Hg) [ Time Frame: Approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The mm Hg distensions refer to the barostat balloon, which was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon. Gas sensation was measured by a 100 mm long Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The VAS does not have any pre-set marks between the extremes. For the gas VAS, 0 means no gas sensation and 100 mm means extreme gas sensation. The investigator measures the mark made by the participant in mm and records this for the value of gas. The values across the 4 distension pressures were averaged for this outcome measure.

  • Pain Sensation Rating Averaged Across 4 Distension Pressures (16, 24, 30, and 36 mg Hg) [ Time Frame: Approximately 60 minutes after drug administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The mm Hg distensions refer to the barostat balloon, which was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon. Pain sensation was measured by a 100 mm long Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The VAS does not have any pre-set marks between the extremes. For the pain VAS, 0 means no pain and 100 mm means extreme pain. The investigator measures the mark made by the participant in mm and records this for the value of pain. The values across the 4 distension pressures were averaged for this outcome measure.


Enrollment: 62
Study Start Date: March 2010
Study Completion Date: February 2011
Primary Completion Date: February 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Pregabalin 75 mg
Subjects randomized to this arm received a single dose of pregabalin 75 mg orally
Drug: Pregabalin
FDA approved medication (capsules) at 75 mg and 200 mg doses
Other Name: Lyrica
Other: Bowel preparation
Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution bowel preparation
Other Name: GoLYTELY
Experimental: Pregabalin 200 mg
Subjects randomized to this arm received a single dose of pregabalin 200 mg orally
Drug: Pregabalin
FDA approved medication (capsules) at 75 mg and 200 mg doses
Other Name: Lyrica
Other: Bowel preparation
Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution bowel preparation
Other Name: GoLYTELY
Placebo Comparator: Placebo
Subjects randomized to this arm received a single dose of placebo medication orally
Drug: Placebo
Placebo capsules
Other: Bowel preparation
Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution bowel preparation
Other Name: GoLYTELY

Detailed Description:

The treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and chronic abdominal pain is advancing with several effective options for symptoms related to bowel dysfunction and bloating/distension. However, there are no approved or effective centrally or peripherally acting visceral analgesics. Pregabalin has been proposed as a treatment for visceral pain, based on the pharmacological actions, and efficacy in neuropathic pain.

This was a trial of healthy adults to compare the effects of oral pregabalin, 75 mg and 200 mg versus placebo on sensation and contraction of the colon using validated methods.

All participants presented on the study day after an overnight bowel preparation with an oral colonic lavage solution and a 12-hour fast. Flexible colonoscopy to the splenic flexure was performed without sedation by one investigator. The barostat catheter (constructed at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN) incorporating six manometric point sensors 5 cm apart was introduced into the colon over a guidewire, and the polyethylene balloon (10 cm long, cylindrical shape with a maximum volume of 600 ml) was placed in the mid-descending or junction of the sigmoid and descending colon. A rigid-piston barostat was used to measure intraballoon pressure and volume throughout the study. After an initial inflation to a volume of 75 ml to ensure unfolding of the balloon, the operating pressure was identified as the distension pressure at which respiratory excursions were recorded clearly from the barostat tracing, and the intraballoon pressure was set 2 mm Hg above the minimal distension pressure. A conditioning distention from 0 to 36 mm Hg in increments of 4 mm Hg every 15 seconds was performed over a period of 3 minutes.

After an equilibration period of 10 minutes, colonic compliance was assessed by the ascending methods of limit (ramp-like increases of 4 mm Hg at 30 section intervals). During the assessment of colonic compliance, participants reported their thresholds for first perception, gas and pain. After another 10 minute equilibration period, fasting colonic tone was measured at operating pressure for a period of 10 minutes.

Randomized-order phasic distentions were then applied at 16, 24, 30, and 36 mm Hg above the operating pressure to measure the sensations of gas and pain. Each distention lasted 1 minute and was followed by an equilibration period at the operating pressure for 2 minutes. A 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess the rating of arousal and stress experienced by each participant before performing the phasic distentions. During the distentions, participants also used the 100-mm VAS to rate the intensity of gas and pain perception at 30 seconds from the start of the distention.

Colonic compliance, fasting tone, pressure thresholds for first perception, gas, and pain, and VAS scores of gas and pain during the phasic distentions were measured before administering the study medication and 1 hour after drug administration. After the postdrug assessment of sensation with phasic distentions, a 30-min assessment of fasting colonic tone was measured in each participant; this provided a baseline to compare the effect of a standard 750-ml chocolate milkshake meal across treatment groups. Postprandial tone was measured over 60 minutes, with the main focus on the first 30 minutes. When the recording was completed, the balloon was deflated and the tube removed by gentle traction.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 75 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

- Healthy males or females

Exclusion criteria:

  • Abdominal surgery other than appendectomy, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, cesarean section, vaginal or laparoscopic hysterectomy or tubal ligation
  • A history of chronic gastrointestinal or systemic illnesses that could affect gastrointestinal motility
  • Any history of hypertension
  • Use of medications that may alter gastrointestinal motility or interact with the study medications
  • Use of any of the study medications within the past 30 days
  • Pregnancy
  • Chronic renal insufficiency (serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL)
  • Psychiatric or psychologic dysfunction.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01094808

Locations
United States, Minnesota
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, Minnesota, United States, 55905
Sponsors and Collaborators
Mayo Clinic
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Michael Camilleri, MD Mayo Clinic
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications:
Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Michael Camilleri, MD, Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01094808     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 09-008469, 1RC1DK086182, R01DK079866, R01DK067071, UL1RR024150
Study First Received: March 24, 2010
Results First Received: January 26, 2012
Last Updated: March 5, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Mayo Clinic:
pregabalin
motor
sensation
colon
pain
gas

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Pregabalin
Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Analgesics
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions
Central Nervous System Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Anticonvulsants
Calcium Channel Blockers
Membrane Transport Modulators
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Cardiovascular Agents
GABA Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2014