Effect of Neuromuscular Warm-up on Injuries in Female Athletes

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01092286
First received: March 23, 2010
Last updated: NA
Last verified: March 2010
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

The goal of the study is to determine effect of coach-led neuromuscular warm-up on non-contact, lower extremity (LE) injury rates among female athletes in a predominantly non-white public high school system. The investigators hypothesized the warm-up would reduce non-contact LE injuries.


Condition Intervention
Knee Injuries
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
Ankle Injuries
Lower Extremity Injuries
Other: neuromuscular warm-up
Other: no neuromuscular warm-up

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Effect of Neuromuscular Warm-up on Injuries in Female Athletes in Urban Public High Schools: A Cluster-randomized Controlled Trial

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • lower extremity injury rates [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • coach compliance with warm-up [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 1586
Study Start Date: July 2006
Primary Completion Date: July 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: warm-up
coaches in this arm use the prescribed warm-up before team practices
Other: neuromuscular warm-up
neuromuscular warm-up exercises that take 20 minutes to perform
Other Name: Knee Injury Prevention Program (KIPP)
No Intervention: no warm-up
coaches use their usual warm-up before team practices
Other: no neuromuscular warm-up
no intervention. Coaches are told to use their usual warm-up

Detailed Description:

We will recruit basketball and soccer coaches and their athletes from Chicago public high schools. We will randomize teams to intervention and control groups. We will train intervention coaches to implement a 20-minute neuromuscular warm-up and tracked training costs. Control coaches will use their usual warm-up. All coaches will report weekly athlete exposures (AEs) and injuries resulting in a missed practice/game. Research assistants will interview injured athletes. We will compare injury rates between control and intervention groups.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years to 20 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • plays basketball or soccer for a Chicago public high school team
  • coaches basketball or soccer for a Chicago public high school team
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01092286

Locations
United States, Illinois
Children's Memorial Hospital
Chicago, Illinois, United States, 60614
Sponsors and Collaborators
Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
  More Information

No publications provided by Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Cynthia LaBella, MD, Children's Memorial Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01092286     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB2006-12888
Study First Received: March 23, 2010
Last Updated: March 23, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago:
Knee injury
ankle sprain
anterior cruciate ligament
adolescent
soccer
basketball
prevention

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Knee Injuries
Ankle Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Leg Injuries

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 19, 2014