Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Risky Injecting Practices Among Injecting Drug Users (IDUs)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Karine Bertrand, Université de Sherbrooke
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00794391
First received: November 19, 2008
Last updated: April 2, 2014
Last verified: April 2014
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a brief motivational intervention in reducing risky injection practices among injecting drug users (IDUs). The investigators hypothesis is that motivational intervention will be more effective than educational intervention in reducing risky injection practices among IDUs.


Condition Intervention
HIV
Hepatitis C
Behavioral: Motivational interviewing
Behavioral: Educational intervention

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Effects of a Brief Motivational Intervention on Risky Injection Practices Among Injecting Drug Users

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Université de Sherbrooke:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Risky injecting practices [ Time Frame: 3 and 6 month follow-ups ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Stages of change for risky injecting practices (adapted from Prochaska & DiClemente) [ Time Frame: 3 and 6 month follow-ups ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Drug use (including injecting frequency) [ Time Frame: 3 and 6 months follow-ups ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 219
Study Start Date: November 2008
Study Completion Date: August 2011
Primary Completion Date: August 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Motivational interviewing
Motivational interviewing is a client-centered, directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence (Miller & Rollnick. 1993). This 45 minutes individual motivational intervention focuses on risky injection practices.
Behavioral: Motivational interviewing
Motivational interviewing is a client-centered, directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence (Miller & Rollnick. 1993). This 45 minutes individual motivational intervention focuses on risky injection practices.
Active Comparator: Educational intervention
The educational intervention is a 45 minutes individual intervention based on a document written by the Québec ministry of health (Québec, Canada). The aim is to inform participants about safe injection practices and to show them how to use sterile injection equipment.
Behavioral: Educational intervention
The educational intervention is a 45 minutes individual intervention based on a document written by the Québec ministry of health (Québec, Canada). The aim is to inform participants about safe injection practices and to show them how to use sterile injection equipment.

Detailed Description:

Injecting drug users (IDUs) are among the most vulnerable populations at risk to contract human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Among Canadian cities, Montreal holds one of the higher HIV and HCV contraction rates in the IDU population. Results from SurvUDI, a population survey among IDUs conducted in the province of Quebec (Canada), show that in Montreal 18% of IDUs are infected with HIV and 67% are infected with HCV. The cornerstone of HIV and HCV prevention strategies is to give information on safe injection practices and to make available sterile syringes and other injection equipment. However, the SurvUDI survey reveals that a large proportion of IDUs recruited in community programs offering sterile injection equipment and information on safe injection practices are still sharing needles with other IDUs. Indeed, it seems that information dissemination and distribution of sterile injection equipment are not sufficient in order to control the HIV and HCV epidemic among IDUs. As a matter of fact, it is obvious that complementary interventions such as behavioural interventions are required. Motivational interviewing is an intervention technique centered on the individual. It aims to enhance intrinsic motivation to change behavior by helping the individual to resolve ambivalence. The scientific literature indicates that brief motivational intervention is a significantly effective intervention in order to reduce drug use problems and other related health problems. Furthermore, motivational intervention is well adapted for IDUs' resistance to change and their difficulties related with involvement in long-term therapeutic process. The present study's hypothesis is that IDUs assigned to the experimental group (brief motivational intervention) will present a greater diminution of their risky injection practices in comparison with IDUs assigned to the control group (educational intervention).

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • In the last month, at least one cocaine injection
  • In the last month, at least one injection with a syringe or another piece of injection equipment that has been used by someone else
  • 16 years old or more
  • French speaking
  • Being able to give informed consent
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00794391

Locations
Canada, Quebec
Université de Sherbrooke, service de toxicomanie (Campus Longueuil)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H2L 1Y8
Sponsors and Collaborators
Université de Sherbrooke
Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Karine Bertrand, Ph.D. Université de Sherbrooke
Study Chair: Élise Roy, MD, MSc Université de Sherbrooke
Study Chair: Carole Morissette, MD, FRCPC Université de Montréal & Direction de santé publique de Montréal
Study Chair: Jean-François Boivin, MD, FRCPC McGill University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Karine Bertrand, Professor, Université de Sherbrooke
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00794391     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 13940 (FRSQ ID)
Study First Received: November 19, 2008
Last Updated: April 2, 2014
Health Authority: Canada: Ethics Review Committee

Keywords provided by Université de Sherbrooke:
Vulnerable Populations
Injecting drug users
IDU
Risky injecting practices
Psychotherapy, brief
Motivational interviewing
Educational activities
Clinical trial
Risk behavior
risk reduction behavior

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hepatitis
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis C
Liver Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Hepatitis, Viral, Human
Virus Diseases
Enterovirus Infections
Picornaviridae Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Flaviviridae Infections

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 21, 2014