Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Alberta, Physical Education
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00221234
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: March 13, 2009
Last verified: March 2009
  Purpose

This project will assess the incremental and cumulative impact of three behavioural intervention strategies for the promotion of physical activity in the adult general population with Type 2 diabetes.


Condition Intervention Phase
Type 2 Diabetes
Behavioral: Print materials, pedometers/logbooks
Behavioral: Print materials, pedometers/logbooks, telephone counselling
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: The Development and Evaluation of Physical Activity Behavioural Strategies for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: A Population Based Approach

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Alberta, Physical Education:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Physical Activity Behaviour

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • HbA1c, CRP, lipid concentrations, fasting blood glucose, insulin, health related quality of life, psychosocial predictors of physical activity.

Estimated Enrollment: 300
Study Start Date: September 2005
Study Completion Date: July 2007
Detailed Description:

An increasing prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes is associated with the aging population, a significant rise in the prevalence of obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle. In Canada, 4.9-7.0% over the age of 12 and 17% over the age of 64 are estimated to have diabetes, 90-95% of which will be Type 2. Strong evidence supports the importance of physical activity in the management of Type 2 Diabetes. However, current literature lacks clear understanding of best strategies for physical activity behaviour change in this target population. Existing studies employ resource intensive, one-to-one individual and clinically-based approaches with limited theoretical grounding for recommended health behaviour change. Most fail to offer practical, sustainable, economically viable solutions, with documented long-term intervention efficacy. The call to move beyond the clinical focus by including theoretically population-based and "real-life" approaches for the management Type 2 Diabetes remains largely unheeded. The three interventions are: (1) standard print-based physical activity educational materials provided by the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA); (2) CDA materials + pedometers and a log book + theoretical stage-matched print-based physical activity materials; and, (3) the same as intervention 2 with the addition of a 12-month physical activity telephone counseling protocol.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

>18 years old, Type 2 Diabetes, Living in the province of Alberta, Can communicate in English.

Exclusion Criteria:

Serious Contraindications to Physical Activity

  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234

Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Alberta, Physical Education
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ron C Plotnikoff, PhD University of Alberta, Physical Education
  More Information

No publications provided by University of Alberta, Physical Education

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00221234     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: MOP-69070
Study First Received: September 13, 2005
Last Updated: March 13, 2009
Health Authority: Canada: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Keywords provided by University of Alberta, Physical Education:
Diabetes
Physical Activity

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Endocrine System Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 15, 2014