Biobehavioral Mechanisms of Blood Pressure Regulation

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005366
First received: May 25, 2000
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: April 2001
  Purpose

To investigate the role of biobehavioral factors in the pathogenesis of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy.


Condition
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Hypertension

Study Type: Observational

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI):

Study Start Date: September 1993
Estimated Study Completion Date: August 1998
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

Hypertension is more prevalent in Black than white men, and is more prevalent in men than women. Furthermore, even controlling for blood pressure, concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, an early structural adaptation of hypertension, is more prevalent in Black than white men, and more prevalent in men than women. Concentric left ventricular hypertrophy is the strongest predictor, other than age, of the cardiovascular morbidity associated with high blood pressure.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

In a biracial sample, concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and concentric remodelling were assessed by echocardiographic measures of left ventricular mass and relative wall thickness. Laboratory procedures were used to: (i) assess hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses during exposure to a diverse battery of physical and psychological stressors, and; (ii) evaluate alpha and beta adrenergic receptor responsiveness, baroreceptor reflex gain and minimal forearm vascular resistance. Since blood pressure during a typical workday was an established predictor of left ventricular hypertrophy, it was also assessed. A new biobehavioral model was tested that implicated the hemodynamic pattern of behaviorally-evoked pressor responses in the pathogenesis of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. One prediction of this model was that a predisposition to exhibit increased vascular resistance during stress (characteristic of black men) would favor the development of concentric hypertrophy. Thus, systemic vascular resistance responses, evaluated in the laboratory, were hypothesized to independently predict left ventricular mass and relative wall thickness, even after controlling for established risk factors, including workday blood pressure. Sympathetic nervous system function was examined to test hypothesized mechanisms responsible for race and gender differences in the hemodynamic patterns of blood pressure regulation. The results of these studies emphasized the importance of race and gender in prescribing pharmacological and/or behavioral treatment for hypertensive heart disease.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   25 Years to 39 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

No eligibility criteria

  Contacts and Locations
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No Contacts or Locations Provided
  More Information

Publications:

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005366     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 4253
Study First Received: May 25, 2000
Last Updated: June 23, 2005
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Hypertension
Vascular Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 21, 2014