Subcutaneously Administered Interleukin-12 Therapy in HIV-Infected Patients With Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium Complex Infection

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00001763
First received: November 3, 1999
Last updated: March 3, 2008
Last verified: April 1999
  Purpose

Disseminated infection with Mycobacteria avium complex (MAC) is one of the most common systemic bacterial infections in advanced stages of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Current therapy for disseminated MAC infection in HIV patients consists of multidrug chemotherapy regimens are often accompanied by toxicities, and many patients become intolerant of one or more agents. Macrolides are the essential component of successful therapy, yet macrolide resistant strains are being recognized with increasing frequency. Thus, there is an interest in identifying additional therapeutic interventions for disseminated MAC in HIV-infected patients. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a central, regulatory cytokine in cell-mediated immunity. IL-12 enhances the cytolytic activity of cytotoxic T and NK cells, and induces interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) production from T and NK cells. This open-label Phase I study is designed to evaluate the safety and immunologic/microbiologic effects of interleukin-12 administration in HIV-infected patients with concomitant disseminated Mycobacterium avium (MAC) infection. Fifteen patients with documented disseminated MAC will be randomized to receive double-blinded placebo or escalating doses of IL-12 in addition to anti-MAC chemotherapy and standard anti-retroviral therapy for six weeks. IL-12 will be administered subcutaneously, with escalating doses every month over the dose range of 30 ng/kg, 100 ng/kg, and 300 ng/kg, or until an individual maximum tolerated dose (IMTD) is reached. Should a patient receive 2 consecutive blood cultures negative for MAC during the course of the study at a lower dose, then he/she will not be further dose escalated. Those patients receiving placebo after 6 weeks will be crossed over to receive the full treatment course of IL-12. Each new dose or dose escalation will take place on an inpatient basis. Once a patient is clinically stable at a dose, the patient will be maintained at that dose as an outpatient for the remainder of the month. Total IL-12 administration will not exceed 12 weeks, or 24 total doses.


Condition Intervention Phase
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infection
Drug: Interleukin-12
Phase 1

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Endpoint Classification: Safety Study
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Subcutaneously Administered Interleukin-12 Therapy in HIV-Infected Patients With Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium Complex Infection

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 15
Study Start Date: April 1998
Estimated Study Completion Date: March 2000
Detailed Description:

Disseminated infection with Mycobacteria avium complex (MAC) is one of the most common systemic bacterial infections in advanced stages of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Current therapy for disseminated MAC infection in HIV patients consists of multidrug chemotherapy regimens are often accompanied by toxicities, and many patients become intolerant of one or more agents. Macrolides are the essential component of successful therapy, yet macrolide resistant strains are being recognized with increasing frequency. Thus, there is an interest in identifying additional therapeutic interventions for disseminated MAC in HIV-infected patients. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a central, regulatory cytokine in cell-mediated immunity. IL-12 enhances the cytolytic activity of cytotoxic T and NK cells, and induces interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) production from T and NK cells. This open-label Phase I study is designed to evaluate the safety and immunologic/microbiologic effects of interleukin-12 administration in HIV-infected patients with concomitant disseminated Mycobacterium avium (MAC) infection or localized MAC infection. Fifteen patients with documented disseminated MAC will be randomized to receive double-blinded placebo or escalating doses of IL-12 in addition to anti-MAC chemotherapy and standard anti-retroviral therapy for six weeks. IL-12 will be administered subcutaneously, with escalating doses every month over the dose range of 30 ng/kg, 100 ng/kg, and 300 ng/kg, or until an individual maximum tolerated dose (IMTD) is reached. Should a patient receive 2 consecutive blood cultures negative for MAC during the course of the study at a lower dose, then he/she will not be further dose escalated. Likewise, patients with localized disease will not be further dose escalated if symptoms/evidence of localized infection resolve as assessed by the principal investigator. Those patients receiving placebo after 6 weeks will be crossed over to receive the full treatment course of IL-12. Each new dose or dose escalation will take place on an inpatient basis. Once a patient is clinically stable at a dose, the patient will be maintained at that dose as an outpatient for the remainder of the month. Total IL-12 administration will not exceed 12 weeks, or 24 total doses.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Documented HIV infection (ELISA and Western blot positive).

18 years or older.

Clinically stable enough to travel to NIH and meet protocol schedule requirements.

Negative urine or serum pregnancy test within 14 days prior to study entry (for women of childbearing potential).

Patients should be receiving a combination of FDA approved antiretroviral drugs or expanded access antiretroviral therapy for at least two weeks prior to study entry. The exception would be that, in the opinion of the primary treating physician, this therapy would not likely provide benefit.

Greater than or equal to 1 positive blood culture or 1 positive culture from a normally sterile site (e.g. lymph node, bone marrow, etc.) for MAC within 6 weeks of study. The initial screening blood culture at the NIH must be positive.

The following lab values must be present at study entry:

Transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin less than or equal to 5x upper limit of normal range.

Serum creatinine less than or equal to 2.0 mg/ml.

Proteinuria less than or equal to positive 1.

Normal PT/PTT.

Granulocyte count greater than or equal to 750/cubic millimeter.

Hemoglobin greater than or equal to 8 gm/dL and platelet count greater than or equal to 75,000.

Fasting Blood glucose 1.25x upper normal limit (126 g/dl). (In persons with no history of diabetes.)

No malignancy other than Kaposi sarcoma. Patients with Kaposi sarcoma are eligible, but must not have received systemic therapy for KS.

No current life threatening AIDS related opportunistic infection other than disseminated MAC.

No evidence of active substance abuse according to the standard 8th floor clinic substance abuse assessment, which allows enrollment at the discretion of the principal investigator.

No patients exhibiting psychiatric disturbance or illness, which in the assessment of the protocol team may affect patient safety or compliance.

No significant cardiac, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, autoimmune, renal, or CNS disease which could interfere with patient safety.

No hypertension requiring anti-hypertensive therapy.

No pregnant or lactating patients, or any patient with an inability or unwillingness to use effective contraception.

Willingness to comply with current NIH Clinical Center guidelines concerning appropriate notification by an individual of current or ongoing sexual partners and/or needle-sharing partners regarding his or her HIV seropositivity and the risk of transmission of HIV infection.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00001763

Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00001763     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 980091, 98-I-0091
Study First Received: November 3, 1999
Last Updated: March 3, 2008
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
AIDS
Cell Mediated Immunity
Cytokine
MAC
Thl Response

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV Infections
Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes
Mycobacterium Infections
Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection
Lentivirus Infections
Retroviridae Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Virus Diseases
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Viral
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Slow Virus Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Actinomycetales Infections
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections
Bacterial Infections
Mycobacterium Infections, Atypical
Interleukin-12
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiogenesis Modulating Agents
Growth Substances
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions
Growth Inhibitors
Antineoplastic Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Adjuvants, Immunologic
Immunologic Factors

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 20, 2014