Frequency of Parenteral and Non-Parenteral Exposures to Blood Among Healthcare Workers at the Clinical Center, NIH and at Seven Academic Hospitals in Japan

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00001712
First received: November 3, 1999
Last updated: March 3, 2008
Last verified: October 2005
  Purpose

Following guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control, the Clinical Center implemented a Universal Precautions policy in November 1987 in an attempt to reduce healthcare workers' risks for occupational exposures to bloodborne pathogens. All hospital personnel whose jobs entailed potential exposure to patients' blood and body substances were required to attend a training session and complete a written examination. Based on data from surveys conducted before and twelve months after training in Universal Precautions, the frequency of cutaneous exposure to blood decreased by 50% in temporal association with implementation of Universal Precautions. Staff at the Clinical Center are required to take a refresher course in Universal Precautions annually.

The prevalence of bloodborne infections is high in Japan; however, Universal Precautions are not widely practiced in Japan. This study is designed: 1) to evaluate and compare nurses' knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, occupational risks, and appropriate prevention strategies for managing patients infected with bloodborne pathogens in the healthcare setting in seven university hospitals in Japan and at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health in the US; 2) to compare self-reported levels of compliance with existing infection control recommendations designed to limit risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens in all four institutions; 3) to compare self-reported frequencies of cutaneous exposures to blood at the four hospitals in the study; and 4) to evaluate the effect of educational intervention on nurses perceived compliance with recommendations and on the frequency of self-reported exposures to blood.


Condition
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
HIV Infection

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: Frequency of Parenteral and Non-Parenteral Exposures to Blood Among Healthcare Workers at the Clinical Center, NIH and at Seven Academic Hospitals in Japan

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 3400
Study Start Date: February 1998
Estimated Study Completion Date: October 2005
Detailed Description:

Following guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control, the Clinical Center implemented a Universal Precautions policy in November 1987 in an attempt to reduce healthcare workers' risks for occupational exposures to bloodborne pathogens. All hospital personnel whose jobs entailed potential exposure to patients' blood and body substances were required to attend a training session and complete a written examination. Based on data from surveys conducted before and twelve months after training in Universal Precautions, the frequency of cutaneous exposure to blood decreased by 50% in temporal association with implementation of Universal Precautions. Staff at the Clinical Center are required to take a refresher course in Universal Precautions annually.

The prevalence of bloodborne infections is high in Japan; however, Universal Precautions are not widely practiced in Japan. This study is designed: 1) to evaluate and compare nurses' knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, occupational risks, and appropriate prevention strategies for managing patients infected with bloodborne pathogens in the healthcare setting in seven university hospitals in Japan and at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health in the US; 2) to compare self-reported levels of compliance with existing infection control recommendations designed to limit risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens in all four institutions; 3) to compare self-reported frequencies of cutaneous exposures to blood at the four hospitals in the study; and 4) to evaluate the effect of educational intervention on nurses perceived compliance with recommendations and on the frequency of self-reported exposures to blood.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Nurses who work in the four cooperating institutions who have clinical responsibilities.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00001712

Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00001712     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 980066, 98-CC-0066
Study First Received: November 3, 1999
Last Updated: March 3, 2008
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Healthcare Worker
Bloodborne Diseases
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Parenteral Exposure
Non-Parenteral Exposure
Blood and Body Substances
Universal Precautions
HIV Seronegativity

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
HIV Infections
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Hepatitis
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Lentivirus Infections
Retroviridae Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Virus Diseases
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Viral
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes
Immune System Diseases
Slow Virus Diseases
Liver Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Hepatitis, Viral, Human
Enterovirus Infections
Picornaviridae Infections
Hepadnaviridae Infections
DNA Virus Infections
Flaviviridae Infections

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 15, 2014