Randomized Controlled Trial of Ways to Improve OVC HIV Prevention and Well-being

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified April 2014 by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Catholic Relief Services, Zambia
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT02054780
First received: September 17, 2013
Last updated: June 4, 2014
Last verified: April 2014
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two types of counseling, Psychosocial Counseling and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, in addressing outcomes of orphans and vulnerable children including mental and behavioral health, well-being, social support, and HIV risk behaviors. The study will be conducted in Lusaka, Zambia.


Condition Intervention
Risk Behavior
Mental Health Impairment
Behavioral: Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Behavioral: Psychosocial Counseling

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Randomized Controlled Trial of Ways to Improve OVC HIV Prevention and Well-being

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in HIV Risk Behavior as measured by the World Aids Foundation (WAF) survey [ Time Frame: Baseline, 0 months post-intervention, 6-months post-intervention, 12 months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome is reported HIV risk behaviors, primarily those related to risky sexual behaviors


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in Mental Health and Well-being [ Time Frame: Baseline, 0 months post-intervention, 6 months post-intervention, 12 months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Child trauma symptoms will be assessed through the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) and internalizing and externalizing symptoms will be assessed through the Youth Self Report (YSR) screening tool.

  • Change in Caregiver mental health and well-being [ Time Frame: Baseline, 0 months post treatment, 6 months follow up, 12 months follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Caregiver mental health and well-being will be assessed through the World Aids Foundation (WAF) questionnaire and a caregiver functioning scale (developed through previous qualitative research in Zambia).


Estimated Enrollment: 750
Study Start Date: February 2014
Estimated Study Completion Date: May 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date: May 2016 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Psychosocial Counseling
The curriculum "Psychosocial Care and Counseling" (PC) was developed for HIV Infected Children and Adolescents. The goal is to enable health care providers to provide safe supportive counseling and support services to HIV infected youth and their families. The course materials are designed to be adapted to different cultures and needs. The 14 modules cover child development, family systems, communicating with children, disclosure and adherence and legal/ethical issues. The course teaches basic counseling skills with children such as listening and play. It explores and challenges barriers to care such as caregivers' fear and reluctance to disclose an HIV positive diagnosis to a child, discussing adolescent sexuality, and practical issues such as inadequate legislation governing child rights. The curriculum was adapted for Zambia and endorsed by the MoH. PC is considered an "enhanced" model of a Psychosocial Support program for OVC.
Behavioral: Psychosocial Counseling
The curriculum "Psychosocial Care and Counseling" was developed for HIV Infected Children and Adolescents. The goal is to enable health care providers to provide safe supportive counseling and support services to HIV infected youth and their families. The course materials are designed to be adapted to different cultures and needs. The 14 modules cover child development, family systems, communicating with children, disclosure and adherence and legal/ethical issues. The course teaches basic counseling skills with children such as listening and play. It explores and challenges barriers to care such as caregivers' fear and reluctance to disclose an HIV positive diagnosis to a child, discussing adolescent sexuality, and practical issues such as inadequate legislation governing child rights. The curriculum was adapted for Zambia and endorsed by the MoH.
Experimental: Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
We propose using TF-CBT to address stress related problems (SRP) and reduce HIV risk behaviors. Given evidence on the link between abuse/trauma and elevated HIV risk, researchers have called for more overlap between evidence-based MH treatments like TF-CBT and HIV prevention programs. Recent trials have provided direct evidence that CBT may be effective in HIV prevention. TF-CBT has eight components including: Psychoeducation, Relaxation, Affective Modulation, Cognitive Coping, Trauma Narrative, In-vivo Exposure (if needed), Conjoint parent-child session, and Enhancing Safety Skills. This cognitive behavioral therapy teaches skills such as how to think about situations differently in order to feel better. It also includes helping a child face the fear and anxiety of the traumatic situations, rather than avoid them. Based on earlier pilot projects, the MoH has endorsed TF-CBT in Zambia.
Behavioral: Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
We propose using TF-CBT to address stress related problems (SRP) and reduce HIV risk behaviors. The rationale is that OVC lack behavioral and cognitive skills and intention necessary to use the available information and resources to prevent HIV. For example, internalizing problems (e.g., depression, anxiety) are related to HIV risk through low self-efficacy, poor assertiveness skills, and reduced ability to negotiate safe sex. Given evidence on the link between abuse/trauma and elevated HIV risk, researchers have called for more overlap between evidence-based MH treatments like TF-CBT and HIV prevention programs. Some studies have found that skills-oriented interventions reduced HIV-risk behaviors among minority and troubled youths. An intervention study using CBT increased condom use and decreased high-risk sexual behaviors among runaway youths in a short-term follow-up evaluation. However, these studies were done in Western countries; their relevance to OVC in Africa is unproven.

  Hide Detailed Description

Detailed Description:

This is a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of TF-CBT compared to PC in improving a range of OVC outcomes including HIV risk behaviors but also mediating factors which constitute important outcomes - well-being, mental health, functioning, and caregiver health and support. The study design also includes measurement of the impact of factors that may moderate effects - age, gender, religion, ethnicity, HIV knowledge and attitudes, education, and physical health. This is an effectiveness trial in that the interventions will be provided by MoH and organizations already providing services to OVC.

Assessments: Study instruments will be administered using an Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interviewing (ACASI) system developed by Tufts University. The Tufts ACASI system allows the responder control to navigate and answer sensitive questions privately and discreetly. It was developed using Macromedia Authorware (v7.0) and can be programmed in any language by having a native speaker record the screen text. The Tufts ACASI system offers both live interview and data entry modes and can deliver a variety of question types, including yes/no, single-answer multiple choice (select one answer), and multiple-answer multiple choice (select all that apply) questions which allow numeric keypad entry, as well as scale questions which allow the user to click on a point along a scale, and text entry for interviewer-administered, open-ended questions

Procedure: In the first part of this study, the research staff will ask Home Based Care Workers (HBCWs) of the Archdiocese of Lusaka (our partnering organization) to introduce the study to families under their care. This visit can take place during the regularly scheduled home visits conducted by the HBCWs. Research staff will ask the HBCWs to use a recruitment script to introduce the study to both the adolescent and his/her caretaker. If the adolescent and/or caretaker are not interested in hearing more about the study, their information will not be passed on to study staff and we will have no contact with that family. If, however, the adolescent and caretaker indicate to the HBCW that they are interested in hearing more about the study, the HBCW will note their interest and schedule a follow-up appointment in which they will return to the home with one of our study assessors.

Each of the study assessors (interviewers; 4-10) will then go with an HBCW to the families' homes that indicated interest in the study. The assessors will present the consent forms, and if the caregiver and child respond yes to the consent, they will administer the screener. This screener will be scored immediately and if the child is determined eligible for the study, the assessor will ask if they are able to complete the full assessment battery at this time (approximately 2 hours) or if they would like to schedule a separate time to complete this. If a separate time/date is preferred, the assessor will schedule that with the family. Most assessors should be able to complete the screening and assessment procedures for all 3-7 families expected from each HBCW in one week. If a particular HBCW has a high number of families (>=9) under their care who are interested, then an additional week of assessments may be necessary. The HBCW will not be present during the consent or assessment process.

The assessor will conduct the adult consent and caretaker permission process with the caretaker first. Consent and permission will be obtained at this time for all parts of the study-- screening, interview using ACASI, and intervention. In all cases, the caretaker will have to provide consent to participate in the interview and intervention for him/herself and will also have to provide permission for the adolescent to participate in the screening, interview, and intervention. For these cases, in the response section the assessor will indicate if the caretaker consents to participate in each of the sections (screening/interview and intervention) separately and gives permission for their adolescent to participate in each of the 3 sections (screener, interview and intervention) separately.

If the adolescent is found to be eligible after the screening interview (through the results of either the adolescent screening, caretaker screening, or both), then the assessor will allocate a sequential study number to the adolescent. At this time, the assessor will ask the adolescent and caregiver if they are able to complete the assessment battery at this time, or if they prefer to set up another day/time to complete it. When the baseline is designated to be completed, the assessor will set up two notebook computers for the baseline interview: one for the adolescent and one for the caretaker. The adolescent and caretaker will complete the interview simultaneously but separately (in separate rooms), with the assessor not present but close by in case of problems or questions. On completion of the baseline interview the assessor will let the family know that someone from their nearest MoH clinic will contact them. The results will be tabulated and checked at the main office, with the locally based project director allocating group assignments (based on a pre-determined random sequence number order sent by U.S. based PIs), and assigning counselors to families. Both interventions will be available at all study sites. Neither assessor, caretaker, nor adolescent will know which intervention the adolescent will receive.

This study will also enroll adolescents who do not have a primary caretaker or who live in child headed households. In these situations the person that is the caretaker has to declare that he/she is the principal caregiver or they have been charged with the responsibility of making sure the adolescent receives care. For any child headed households or street youth, the ministry of community and social welfare should be contacted. In these cases the ministry usually has the adolescent themselves consent before they could be involved.

At the end of each day all assessors will report the allocated study IDs to the on-site Study Director, who will send them to the PIs who retain the confidential master list linking study IDs to interventions based on random assignment (see below). She will respond with the allocations for those study IDs. These data will be used to inform the clinics which intervention each new participant will receive prior to their first visit.

Whether or not an adolescent agrees to join the study s/he will have access to other services under the Archdiocese of Lusaka. These services include Psychosocial Counseling, Home Based Care services, medical and education support, VCT, Community Sensitization Campaigns, Behavioral Change, livelihood support, TB care, awareness programs on communicable diseases. The adolescent will also have access to the HIV prevention strategies available at the MoH clinics including, VCT, counseling, safe sex interventions and primary care services. For those in the study, we will monitor utilization of these services and include that information as a variable in the analysis, to determine their effects as potential moderators of treatment effects.

The adolescent will either go to a MoH clinic or a different, pre-identified community center for their first appointment with their counselor to receive either TF-CBT or PC. Later sessions will either be at the clinic or at another location that the counselor and family agree on, and locations can vary from week to week if necessary and feasible. The caretaker will also participate in these sessions (if they have consented to participate in the study along with the adolescent). Because the Archdiocese of Lusaka sites are deeply embedded into the community, other neighborhood structures—such as churches—may be used as meeting points.

Follow-up Assessments with both adolescent and caretaker will be done at 0 and 6 months after completion of the interventions. If one treatment shows substantially greater efficacy at 6 months it will be offered to those that received the other intervention and the 12 month assessment will be done only with the group originally allocated to the more effective intervention.

We expect to have 3-4 study contacts with research participants and their caregivers:

  1. Baseline interview
  2. Follow-up at 0 months
  3. Follow-up interview at 6 months
  4. Follow-up interview at 12 months.
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   13 Years to 17 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 13-17 year olds
  • Live in the compounds served by HBCW's of the Archdiocese (i.e., not staying temporarily)
  • Both OVC and caretaker speak English, Nyanja, or Bemba.
  • Responses to the screening measure suggest the presence of behaviors that increase risk of HIV.
  • Responds "yes" to one of the study criteria for an orphaned or vulnerable child (see definition above)
  • Adolescent assents to participate and caregiver provides permission for the adolescent to participate as well as consents to his/her own participation in project

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Currently on an unstable psychiatric drug regimen (i.e., regimen altered in last 2 months)
  • Suicide attempt or suicidal ideation with intent or plan, or self-harm in the past month.
  • A current psychotic disorder (identified by OVC STEPS programming or other sources).
  • Serious developmental disorder (e.g., mental retardation, autism) that would preclude participation in cognitive-behavioral oriented skills intervention
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02054780

Contacts
Contact: Laura Murray, PhD 9176170234 lamurray@jhsph.edu

Locations
Zambia
Catholic Relief Services Recruiting
Lusaka, Zambia
Contact: Stephanie Skavenski, MPH, MA       sskavenski@yahoo.com   
Sub-Investigator: Stephanie Skavenski, MA, MPH         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Catholic Relief Services, Zambia
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Laura Murray, PhD Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Principal Investigator: Paul Bolton, MBBS, MPH, MSc Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02054780     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 5R01HD070720
Study First Received: September 17, 2013
Last Updated: June 4, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board
Zambia: Ministry of Health
Zambia: Research Ethics Committee

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 23, 2014