Correlation of Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Glucose Tolerance Testing With Pregnancy Outcomes

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
DexCom, Inc.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Yasser Yehia El-Sayed, Stanford University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00850135
First received: February 20, 2009
Last updated: December 7, 2012
Last verified: December 2012
  Purpose

Diabetic pregnant patients are at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including larger than expected fetuses and unplanned operative deliveries, due to elevated blood glucose levels. the one-hour glucola test is currently used to screen pregnant patients for gestational diabetes. This involves ingesting a 50-gram glucose load, followed by a blood test one hour later. We wish to compare 7-day continuous glucose monitoring to the one-hour glucola test, and determine which one correlates better with adverse pregnancy outcomes as well as which one more accurately identifies patients at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.


Condition Intervention Phase
Diabetes, Gestational
Device: The Seven Continuous Glucose Monitoring System
Phase 1
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Diagnostic
Official Title: Correlation of Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Glucose Tolerance Testing With Pregnancy Outcomes

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Stanford University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Birth weight centile [ Time Frame: At time of delivery ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Unplanned operative deliveries [ Time Frame: t time of delivery ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 230
Study Start Date: February 2009
Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: June 2014 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Continuous Glucose Monitor for diabetes in pregnancy screening Device: The Seven Continuous Glucose Monitoring System
Between 24-28 weeks of gestation, the recommended period of glucola testing, a soft sensor for continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) will be inserted superficially under the skin. The patient will be instructed on how to wear and care for the device. She will wear the CGMS for 7 days, then return to the clinic for removal of the device, and downloading of the data. Finger stick blood glucoses will be checked by the patient 2 times daily during the 7 days of wearing the CGMS.
Other Name: The Seven Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

Detailed Description:

All pregnant patients without pre-existing diabetes will be eligible for the study. Interest in participation will be determined at their initial prenatal visit. Those that are interested will be consented. Between 24-28 weeks of gestation, the recommended period of glucola testing, a soft sensor for continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) will be inserted superficially under the skin. The patient will be instructed on how to wear and care for the device. She will wear the CGMS for 7 days, then return to the clinic for removal of the device, and downloading of the data. She will perform the routine glucola test sometime between days 2 to 7 . Finger stick blood glucoses will be checked by the patient 2 times daily during the 7 days of wearing the CGMS. Results of CGMS will not be available to the patient or her physician until after completion of the pregnancy. The patient will be treated routinely, based on the results of the routine glucola test.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 50 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnant patients
  • Age 18-50
  • Gestational age less than 28 weeks

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Minors less than 18 years of age
  • Multiple gestation
  • Known fetal anomalies
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00850135

Locations
United States, California
Santa Clara Valley Medical Center
San Jose, California, United States, 95128
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, California, United States, 94305
Sponsors and Collaborators
Stanford University
DexCom, Inc.
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Yasser Yehia El-Sayed Stanford University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Yasser Yehia El-Sayed, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00850135     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SU-02052009-1738, IRB #12335
Study First Received: February 20, 2009
Last Updated: December 7, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Diabetes, Gestational
Pregnancy Complications
Diabetes Mellitus
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Endocrine System Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2014