Dysphotopsia Following Laser Peripheral Iridotomy

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Iqbal Ike Ahmed, Credit Valley EyeCare
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01758237
First received: December 20, 2012
Last updated: February 11, 2013
Last verified: February 2013

December 20, 2012
February 11, 2013
January 2008
January 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Presence of Linear Dysphotopsia [ Time Frame: Baseline (Time =0),1 month ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
The change in presence of linear dysphotopsia from baseline (prior to intervention) to 1 month after the Nd:YAG laser intervention is performed.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01758237 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Presence of Visual Dysphotopsia [ Time Frame: Baseline (Time = 0), 1 month ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    This includes Halo, Crescent, Ghost Images, Glare, Shadows. This records the change in the presence of these symptoms from baseline (prior to intervention) and 1 month after the Nd:YAG laser intervention.
  • Pain Experienced [ Time Frame: Procedure (Time = 0) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The pain experienced when the Nd:YAG procedure is performed. This is on a scale of 0-10 with 0 being no pain and 10 the most severe pain imaginable.
  • Nd:YAG Laser Power Used [ Time Frame: Procedure (Time = 0) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The amount of laser power used on the Nd:YAG laser to perform the intervention.
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Dysphotopsia Following Laser Peripheral Iridotomy
Incidence of Visual Symptom Following Laser (Nd:YAG ) Peripheral Iridotomy (LPI) in Relation to Position of LPI

To establish the correlation of the location of the Nd:YAG laser peripheral iridotomy to the post operative visual symptoms experienced by some patients. The investigators hypothesize that fully uncovered laser peripheral iridotomy will produce less significant dysphotopsia, due to avoidance of the prismatic effect produced by the tear film than those covered.

Nd:YAG LPI is a frequently performed procedure for patients who have narrow angles at risk of acute angle closure glaucoma, pupillary-block conditions, chronic angle closure, and pigment dispersion syndrome. Most complications associated with the procedure are benign and include intraocular pressure (IOP) spike, transient uveitis, hyphema, corneal or lens damage and closure of the iridotomy. Visual disturbances have been also reported but only a few papers address this specific issue. The rate of these symptoms vary between 2.7% and 4%. It is believed that these symptoms are associated with the fact that light enters through the LPI and thus creating abnormal visual symptoms. Hence it has been suggested to carefully place the LPI so that the eyelid fully covers the LPI, therefore preventing light getting through. However, reports of patients with fully covered LPIs and visual disturbances have led to hypothesize the theory that even when fully covered by the eyelid, light can access through the LPI by a base-up prism created by the tear meniscus at the lid margin. Therefore, placement of the LPI, fully covered, partially covered or totally uncovered can potentially lead to equally significant symptoms. This study will attempt to address the issue of placement of the LPI in relationship with visual symptoms.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Narrow Angle Patients at Risk for Angle Closure Glaucoma
  • Device: Neodymium-doped: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser
    This device is used to perform the peripheral iridotomy on all patients. It is a standard of care approved device.
    Other Name: Nd:YAG Laser
  • Procedure: Nd:YAG Laser Peripheral Iridotomy
    After application of topical anesthetic to the eye undergoing the LPI, the patient is seated at the laser machine. Abraham iridotomy lens filled with a viscous material will be used to facilitate the procedure. The thinnest area of the iris quadrant treated will be chosen. Nd:YAG Laser will be applied until iridotomy is opened satisfactory.
    Other Name: Nd:YAG LPI
  • Experimental: Superior Laser Peripheral Iridotomy
    Neodymium-doped: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser peripheral iridotomy was performed on the superior aspect of the iris in the eye being treated. This will be in the 11 to 1 o'clock position.
    Interventions:
    • Device: Neodymium-doped: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser
    • Procedure: Nd:YAG Laser Peripheral Iridotomy
  • Experimental: Temporal Laser Peripheral Iridotomy
    Neodymium-doped: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser peripheral iridotomy was performed on the temporal aspect of the iris in the eye being treated. The position will be in the 2 to 4 o'clock in the left eye and 8 to 10 o'clock in the right eye.
    Interventions:
    • Device: Neodymium-doped: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser
    • Procedure: Nd:YAG Laser Peripheral Iridotomy

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
214
January 2009
January 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Able and willing to make the required study visit
  • Able and willing to give consent and follow study instructions
  • An indication to undergo laser peripheral iridotomy (narrow angles, occludeable angle at risk of acute angle closure, pupil block condition, chronic angle closure, pigment dispersion syndrome)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Previous intraocular surgery
  • Best corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40
  • Asymmetrical ptosis of more than 2mm
  • Any active intraocular inflammation
  • Acute attack of angle closure glaucoma
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT01758237
CVEC-LPI
No
Iqbal Ike Ahmed, Credit Valley EyeCare
Credit Valley EyeCare
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Iqbal Ike K Ahmed, MD University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
Study Director: Vanessa Vera, MD University of Toronto, Canada
Credit Valley EyeCare
February 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP