Adaptive Interventions for Minimally Verbal Children With ASD in the Community (AIM-ASD)

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified June 2013 by Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01751698
First received: December 14, 2012
Last updated: May 8, 2014
Last verified: June 2013

December 14, 2012
May 8, 2014
January 2013
January 2018   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Primary Outcome 1: Language Sample [ Time Frame: Follow-Up; 8 months on average ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in socially communicative spontaneous utterances (SCU; primary outcome).
Primary Outcome 1: Language Sample [ Time Frame: Follow-Up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in socially communicative spontaneous utterances (SCU; primary outcome).
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01751698 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Secondary Aim 1: Joint Engagement [ Time Frame: Follow-Up; 8 months on average ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in symbol-infused joint engagement.
  • Secondary Outcome 2: Number of Unique Words (Vocabulary) [ Time Frame: Follow-Up; 8 months on average ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in number of unique words.
  • Secondary Outcome 3: Object Play [ Time Frame: Follow-Up; 8 months on average ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in object play level.
  • Secondary Aim 1: Joint Engagement [ Time Frame: Follow-Up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in symbol-infused joint engagement.
  • Secondary Outcome 2: Number of Unique Words (Vocabulary) [ Time Frame: Follow-Up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in number of unique words.
  • Secondary Outcome 3: Object Play [ Time Frame: Follow-Up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine which intervention for minimally verbal children (JASP-EMT vs. CORE-DTT) produces greater increases in object play level.
  • Parent Training [ Time Frame: Follow-Up; 8 months on average ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine whether adding a parent training component provides additional benefit among participants who demonstrate a positive early response to either JASP-EMT or CORE-DTT.
  • Treatment Effects [ Time Frame: Follow-Up; 8 months on average ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To compare and contrast four pre-specified adaptive interventions in terms of primary and secondary outcomes.
  • Moderators [ Time Frame: Follow-Up; 8 months on average ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine whether (a) baseline repetitive behavior, (b) baseline object interest, and (c) parent expectations for the specific intervention moderate intervention outcomes.
  • Parent Training [ Time Frame: Follow-Up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine whether adding a parent training component provides additional benefit among participants who demonstrate a positive early response to either JASP-EMT or CORE-DTT.
  • Treatment Effects [ Time Frame: Follow-Up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To compare and contrast four pre-specified adaptive interventions in terms of primary and secondary outcomes.
  • Moderators [ Time Frame: Follow-Up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine whether (a) baseline repetitive behavior, (b) baseline object interest, and (c) parent expectations for the specific intervention moderate intervention outcomes.
 
Adaptive Interventions for Minimally Verbal Children With ASD in the Community
Adaptive Interventions for Minimally Verbal Children With ASD in the Community

Adaptive Interventions for Minimally Verbal Children with ASD in the Community, seeks support to construct an adaptive intervention that utilizes two efficacious interventions (JASP-EMT and CORE- DTT) that have shown promise for optimizing the number of unique socially communicative and spontaneously spoken words in minimally verbal children with ASD. The study utilizes a novel sequential multiple assignment-randomized trial to evaluate and construct an optimal adaptive intervention. A total of 192 minimally verbal school aged children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (aged 5 to 8 years of age) will participate across four sites, University of California Los Angeles, University of Rochester, Vanderbilt University and Weill Cornell Medical Center with methodological and statistical support from University of Michigan.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Autism
  • Behavioral: JASP-EMT
    JASP-EMT is a developmentally anchored behavioral intervention that assumes that communication develops from social interactions in which specific social engagement strategies, symbolic representations, and early communication forms are modeled and naturally reinforced by adult partner responses to the child. The goal of JASP-EMT is to increase (a) joint engagement, (b) initiating joint attention gestures, (c) social play involving objects and persons, and (d) verbal and nonverbal communication by facilitating meaningful social interactions. The social interaction foundation of JASP-EMT is critical. Modeling and expansions of communicative behaviors and play are used strategically within meaningful social interactions with therapists and caregivers.
  • Behavioral: DTT
    CORE-DTT is based on behavioral learning theory in which communication and related skills are taught through systematic direct instruction. The goal of CORE-DTT is to help children be successful in learning communication skills by breaking these skills down into small steps, providing systematic direct instruction on each step, and reinforcing children (e.g., with praise or access to preferred items) for demonstrating skills. Imitation and attention skills are a main focus early in intervention. DTT is the most common evidence-based approach for teaching children with ASD, and is often considered the closest to a 'standard of practice' for the field.
  • Active Comparator: JASP-EMT
    JASP-EMT (Joint Attention, Symbolic Play and Enhanced Milieu Teaching) focuses on creating a context for joint engagement within naturally occurring child-led play routines. There is evidence of the effects of these interventions with children with ASD, and pilot data showing effects with minimally verbal children.
    Intervention: Behavioral: JASP-EMT
  • Active Comparator: DTT
    CORE-DTT (discrete trial training for core features of ASD) emphasizes didactic adult-led instruction and is considered the current evidenced-based 'standard of care' for children with autism (NRC, 2001).
    Intervention: Behavioral: DTT

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
192
January 2018
January 2018   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Clinical diagnosis of autism
  • At least 4 years, 6 months old, and not older than 8 years, 6 months
  • Displays less than 20 spontaneous, unique, and socially communicative words during screening assessments
  • At least 18 months developmental age
  • Currently in school

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of syndrome or degenerative disorder
  • Poorly controlled seizures
Both
54 Months to 102 Months
No
Contact: Connie Kasari, PhD (310) 825-8342 kasari@gseis.ucla.edu
Contact: Stephanie Y Shire, PhD (310) 825-6189 spatterson@mednet.ucla.edu
United States
 
NCT01751698
RO1HD073975, R01HD073975
No
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Principal Investigator: Connie Kasari, PhD University of California, Los Angeles
Principal Investigator: Ann Kaiser, PhD Vanderbilt University
Principal Investigator: Tristram Smith, PhD University of Rochester
Principal Investigator: Catherine Lord, PhD Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
June 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP