Boston Alcohol Research Collaboration on HIV/AIDS (ARCH) Cohort

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified August 2014 by Boston Medical Center
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Richard Saitz, Boston Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01740115
First received: November 30, 2012
Last updated: August 22, 2014
Last verified: August 2014

November 30, 2012
August 22, 2014
November 2012
August 2016   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Annual mean percent change in hip (femoral neck) bone mineral density (g/cm2) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 13.4.2 (Bone Densitometer)
Annual mean percent change in hip (femoral neck) bone mineral density (g/cm2) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 12.6.1 (Bone Densitometer)
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01740115 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Annual mean percent change in spine (trabecular bone) bone mineral density (g/cm2) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 13.4.2 (Bone Densitometer) Safety Issue?: No
  • Proportion with bone mineral density decrease of >6% [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 13.4.2 (Bone Densitometer)
  • Proportion with osteopenia (bone mineral density t score -1 to -2.5 SDs compared to a young adult reference population mean) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 13.4.2 (Bone Densitometer)
  • Proportion of osteoporosis (bone mineral density t score <-2.5 SDs compared to a young adult reference population mean) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 13.4.2 (Bone Densitometer)
  • Fractures (vertebral, hip, wrist) [ Time Frame: 12 months prior to study entry through final visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Self-report of ever fracture at each site (vertebral, hip, wrist) and fracture in past 12-months collected at baseline and each annual time point.
  • Annual mean percent change in bone mineral density (g/cm2) at site with lowest bone mineral density (spine [trabecular bone] or hip [femoral neck]) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 13.4.2 (Bone Densitometer)
  • Annual mean percent change in spine (trabecular bone) bone mineral density (g/cm2) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 12.6.1 (Bone Densitometer) Safety Issue?: No
  • Proportion with bone mineral density decrease of >6% [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 12.6.1 (Bone Densitometer)
  • Proportion with osteopenia (bone mineral density t score -1 to -2.5 SDs compared to a young adult reference population mean) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 12.6.1 (Bone Densitometer)
  • Proportion of osteoporosis (bone mineral density t score <-2.5 SDs compared to a young adult reference population mean) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 12.6.1 (Bone Densitometer)
  • Fractures (vertebral, hip, wrist) [ Time Frame: 12 months prior to study entry through final visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Self-report of ever fracture at each site (vertebral, hip, wrist) and fracture in past 12-months collected at baseline and each annual time point.
  • Annual mean percent change in bone mineral density (g/cm2) at site with lowest bone mineral density (spine [trabecular bone] or hip [femoral neck]) [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Bone mineral density will be measured using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanner and software, version 12.6.1 (Bone Densitometer)
Bone mineral density, bone mineral content, trabecular thickness, separation and number, volume fraction and cortical thickness [ Time Frame: Between study entry and final visit (minimum of 12 months) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Exploratory outcomes will be assessed using HR-pQCT (wrist and ankle)
Same as current
 
Boston Alcohol Research Collaboration on HIV/AIDS (ARCH) Cohort
Addressing Alcohol/HIV Consequences in Substance Dependence - Boston ARCH Cohort

The purpose of this study is to expand and continue a cohort of HIV-infected adults to establish the longitudinal Boston ARCH Cohort of 250 HIV-infected men and women with current substance dependence or ever injection drug use that have a spectrum of alcohol use; and to determine the effect of alcohol consumption on changes in bone health prospectively in the Cohort.

Unhealthy alcohol use (i.e. the spectrum ranging from heavy drinking that risks health consequences to dependence) is common among HIV-infected persons and is associated with worse health outcomes among people with HIV infection. However, much remains unknown about alcohol-related health effects in those affected by multiple drugs (particularly opioids), or about specific health effects such as detriment to bone. Alcohol use can disrupt bone remodeling by suppressing formation and increasing resorption; heavy alcohol use is associated with both osteopenia (low bone mineral density [BMD]) and incidence of fractures. Osteopenia is common among HIV-infected patients, and fractures are more common in these patients than among adults without HIV infection. Duration of HIV infection has been found to be associated with low BMD, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) also appears to be associated with BMD decline. While bone health is likely affected by HIV infection, ART, alcohol and other drug (e.g. opioid) use (in addition to other known risk factors), the alcohol-osteopenia association among those with HIV infection is not well-characterized. It is not known whether there is an association, the magnitude and nature of that association, and how the relationship is affected by other commonly co-occurring factors (e.g. opioid use, ART).

Accordingly, as part of the Uganda Russia Boston Alcohol Network for Alcohol Research Collaboration on HIV/AIDS (URBAN ARCH) Consortium, we seek to expand and continue a cohort of HIV-infected adults to establish the Boston ARCH Cohort of 250 HIV-infected adults affected by multiple substances and that have a spectrum of alcohol use. This observational prospective cohort study will involve in-person assessments that will take place at 6-month intervals; participants will be followed for a minimum of 1 year and a maximum of 3.5 years. All assessments will include a researcher-administered questionnaire and breath alcohol test. In addition, the baseline assessment and each annual assessment (12, 24 or 36 months after enrollment) will also include: a urine pregnancy test (females only), blood collection, measurement of bone mineral density of the hip and spine (using Hologic QDR 4500W enhanced-array, whole-body, dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry [Bone Densitometer]), and measurement of bone microarchitecture of the wrist and ankle (using Xtreme CT [a device that measures high-resolution three-dimensional peripheral quantitative computed tomography]). We will conduct laboratory tests on blood samples collected at these time points, including tests for 25(OH) vitamin D3 and phosphatidylethanol (PEth). Remaining plasma and serum samples will be stored for future study of bone markers such as: parathyroid hormone, testosterone, carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks (CTX) (a marker of osteoclast activity), and osteocalcin (osteoblast activity).

In summation, this study will measure the effect of alcohol consumption on changes in bone health prospectively in HIV-infected adults with current substance dependence or ever injection drug use. To our knowledge, no other prospective HIV/bone study has studied these relevant factors simultaneously or used HR-pQCT to assess bone microarchitecture. Data on alcohol risks to bone health is important information for defining risky drinking amounts for people with HIV infection (and for advising such patients accordingly).

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples With DNA
Description:

We are storing serum and plasma for future use. We are also storing dried blood spots.

Non-Probability Sample

Subjects from an existing cohort of HIV-infected adults (Facilitated Access to Substance Abuse Treatment With Prevention and Treatment of HIV [FAST PATH]) who have indicated interest in future studies and patients from HIV clinical care sites will be recruited.

  • HIV Infection
  • Alcohol Use
  • Bone Disease
  • Substance-Related Disorders
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
250
August 2016
August 2016   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Documented HIV antibody by ELISA confirmed by Western Blot or current HIV viral load greater than 10,000 (in any medical record); or HIV antibody by 4th generation ELISA confirmed by a "Multi-Spot" rapid test for discrimination of HIV-1 from HIV-2 infection and, if necessary in the case of discordant results, nucleic acid testing (NAT) for HIV-1; or any other confirmatory pathway approved by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or Boston Medical Center, Center for Infectious Diseases.
  2. Current (12-month) substance dependence, determined by using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) or ever injection drug use (IDU)
  3. Ability to speak English (fluency)
  4. At least one contact person who is likely to know whereabouts (to assist with follow-up)

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Under age 18
  2. Pregnancy (confirmed by urine test)
  3. Plans to leave Boston area in <1 year
  4. Inability to consent or understand interview (determined by trained research assistant)
Both
18 Years and older
No
United States
 
NCT01740115
U01AA020784, U01AA020784
Yes
Richard Saitz, Boston Medical Center
Boston Medical Center
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Principal Investigator: Richard Saitz, MD, MPH Boston Medical Center
Boston Medical Center
August 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP