Sugar Sweetened Beverages (SSB)- Effects on Metabolism

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified June 2013 by University of Zurich
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
SNF Swiss National Foundation
University of Lausanne
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Zurich
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01733563
First received: November 9, 2012
Last updated: June 27, 2013
Last verified: June 2013

November 9, 2012
June 27, 2013
April 2013
December 2015   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Lipogenesis [ Time Frame: After total 6 weeks dietary intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Measurement of lipogenesis is based on i. v. administration of stable isotope labelled acetate (1,2-13C-acetate). 13C incorporation into palmitate is quantified by mass-spectrometry. 13C incorporation correlates to the rate of fatty acid synthesis.
Lipogenesis [ Time Frame: After total 8 weeks dietary intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Measurement of lipogenesis is based on i. v. administration of stable isotope labelled acetat (1,2-13C-acetat). 13C incorporation into palmitat is quantified by mass-spectrometry. 13C incorporation correlates to the rate of fatty acid synthesis.
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01733563 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Lipolysis [ Time Frame: After total 6 weeks dietary intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Measurements using stable isotopes
Lipolysis [ Time Frame: After total 8 weeks dietary intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Measurements using stable isotops
Waist/Hip Ratio [ Time Frame: After total 6 weeks dietary intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Measurement waist/hip ratio using a nonstretchable band
Waist/Hip Ratio [ Time Frame: After total 8 weeks dietary intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Measurement waist/hip ratio using a nonstretchable band
 
Sugar Sweetened Beverages (SSB)- Effects on Metabolism
Effects of Carbohydrate Containing Diets on Lipid Metabolism & Fatty Acid Oxidation in Healthy Young Men - a Randomized, Double-Blinded Study.

The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of sugar sweetened beverages on the fat metabolism of healthy young men. It is well known that consumption of beverages sweetened with fructose is associated with different health risks such as type 2 diabetes. The present study has been designed to dissect differences in the metabolic pathways of fructose and glucose, but also metabolic adaptations during fructose, glucose and sucrose diets. During a period of eight weeks subjects will consume either fructose, glucose, sucrose or aspartame sweetened beverages or continue their usual drinking habits. During these eight weeks there will be different metabolic investigations using stable isotope tracers. First, fructose metabolism will be examined. Second, the rate of lipolysis and beta-oxidation will be determined. Third, the rates of fatty acid synthesis will be measured. During all examinations there will also be substrate- and energy-utilization measurements by indirect calorimetry, blood analysis and morphometric measurements. Based on the literature main hypotheses are: Fructose enhances de novo lipogenesis postprandially and also in the fasting state significantly more than glucose by enhanced expression of lipogenic enzymes. Fructose decreases beta oxidation via downregulation of oxidative enzymes. In addition, the effects of fructose consumption on the longterm memory will be assessed.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Metabolism
Procedure: Soft drink consumption
  • Experimental: fructose sweetened beverage

    Soft drink consumption:

    Subjects have to drink a fructose sweetened beverage (3x 200ml per day, 13.3g fructose/100ml) during 8 weeks

    Intervention: Procedure: Soft drink consumption
  • Experimental: glucose sweetened beverage

    Soft drink consumption:

    Subjects have to drink a glucose sweetened beverage (3x 200ml per day, 13.3g glucose/100ml) during 8 weeks

    Intervention: Procedure: Soft drink consumption
  • Experimental: sucrose sweetened beverage

    Soft drink consumption:

    Subjects have to drink a sucrose sweetened beverage (3x 200ml per day, 13.3g sucrose/100ml) during 8 weeks

    Intervention: Procedure: Soft drink consumption
  • Experimental: aspartame sweetened beverage

    Soft drink consumption:

    Subjects have to drink an aspartame sweetened beverage (3x 200ml per day, 66.6 mg aspartame/100ml) during 8 weeks

    Intervention: Procedure: Soft drink consumption
  • Experimental: No change of eating habits

    No Soft drink consumption (no soft drink diet):

    Subjects do not change their eating habits during 8 weeks

    Intervention: Procedure: Soft drink consumption
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
120
December 2015
December 2015   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion criteria:

  • Healthy male volunteers aged 18-30
  • BMI between 19-24 kg/m2
  • Non-smoker

Exclusion criteria:

  • Acute or chronic infections, malignant disease, renal, hepatic (more than two-fold increased transaminases), pulmonary, neurological (epilepsy) or psychiatric diseases, manifested atherosclerosis, or any other disease precluding participation in the study.
  • Diabetes
  • Known alcohol, substance or drug abuse, concomitant medication
  • More than three hours of physical exercise per week
  • Consumption of more than 2 times 3 dl SSB daily
  • Subjects likely to fail to comply with the study protocol
  • Subjects who do not give informed consent
Male
18 Years to 30 Years
No
Contact: Bettina Geidl, PhD bettina.geidl@usz.ch
Contact: Kaspar Berneis, Prof MD kaspar.berneis@usz.ch
Switzerland
 
NCT01733563
SSB-Effects on metabolism
No
University of Zurich
University of Zurich
  • SNF Swiss National Foundation
  • University of Lausanne
Principal Investigator: Kaspar Berneis, Prof MD University Hospital Zurich, Endocrinology and Diabetology
University of Zurich
June 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP