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Self-Affirmation and Response to Health Risk Information

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01668771
First received: August 16, 2012
Last updated: October 24, 2014
Last verified: May 2013

August 16, 2012
October 24, 2014
August 2012
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01668771 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Self-Affirmation and Response to Health Risk Information
Self-Affirmation, Affect, and Implementation Intentions for Alcohol Cessation

Background:

- Self-affirmation is the process of reflecting on values that a person considers important. This process may encourage people to be more open to information about health risks. It may also encourage them to change their behaviors or lifestyle to decrease these health risks. Researchers want to look at the effect of self-affirmation on people s responses to new health risk information. Because recent studies have linked alcohol consumption to increased risk of breast cancer, the study will focus on alcohol s link to breast cancer.

Objectives:

- To study how self-affirmation can change opinions following a message about a health risk.

Eligibility:

- Women at least 18 years of age who drink at least two alcoholic beverages per week and/or at least three alcoholic beverages per sitting.

Design:

  • Participants will be recruited through an online panel. The study will be conducted entirely online.
  • Participants will respond to two short studies. The first will ask about life events and how they make people feel. The second will look at how people respond to information about alcohol and breast cancer.
  • For the first study, participants will write a paragraph or two about an important event in their lives. They will answer questions about how that event made them feel. They will also write a paragraph about an important personal value.
  • For the second study, participants will read information about alcohol and breast cancer risk. They will then answer questions about this information. They will also answer questions about their beliefs about alcohol and breast cancer.
  • Participants will receive financial compensation for being in this study.

This study aims to examine whether emotional state moderates the effect of self-affirmation on intentions to engage in proactive behavior following a message about a health threat. Specifically, we propose to examine whether self-affirmation a process by which individuals reflect on cherished personal values differentially affects the persuasiveness of a message about the link between alcohol and breast cancer depending on whether individuals are in a particular emotional state. Previous evidence suggests that self affirmation may reduce defensiveness to threatening health information, increasing openness to the message and resulting in increased disease risk perceptions, disease-related worry, and intentions to engage in preventive behavior. However, self-affirmation may be differentially effective depending on the prior emotional state of the individual. Human subjects (women who report having consumed one or more alcoholic beverages in the past month) will be randomly assigned to write about an emotional event (something that made them happy, sad, angry, or hopeful) or to a neutral emotion condition (writing about a room in their house). Then, they will be randomly assigned to self-affirm (write about why a particular value is important to them) or to be in a control condition (write about why a particular value might be important to someone else). Following the autobiographical emotion task and self-affirmation, subjects will read about the link between alcohol and breast cancer. Finally, they will be asked a series of questions about their intentions to reduce drinking, their perceived risk of breast cancer, and their worry about breast cancer. Drawing on previous research, we hypothesize that self-affirmation will be most effective for those asked to recall a happy or angry experience, and least effective for those asked to recall a sad or hopeful experience

Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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  • Alcohol Drinking
  • Emotions
  • Ego
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
1116
May 2013
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  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:
  • Knowledge Networks panel respondents will be included if they are women who report having consumed the equivalent of 2-3 or more alcoholic beverage per week and/ or 3 or more alcoholic beverages in one sitting.
  • Women will be included if they report drinking 3 or more drinks on any occasion, or more than 2-3 times per week.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • Women will be excluded if they report never drinking alcohol or drinking monthly or 2-4 times per month, 1-2 drinks or less each time.
  • All men, and women who report a lower threshold of alcohol consumption, will be excluded
Female
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01668771
999912162, 12-C-N162
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National Cancer Institute (NCI)
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Principal Investigator: Rebecca A Ferrer, Ph.D. National Cancer Institute (NCI)
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
May 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP