Evaluation of Treatment Related Toxicity After Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified March 2013 by Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr. Sandra Nuyts, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01621048
First received: June 13, 2012
Last updated: March 11, 2013
Last verified: March 2013

June 13, 2012
March 11, 2013
June 2012
December 2016   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
toxicity [ Time Frame: 5 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01621048 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Evaluation of Treatment Related Toxicity After Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer
Evaluation of Treatment Related Toxicity After Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer and Correlation With Dose to Organs at Risk

Radiotherapy plays an important role in the curative treatment of head and neck cancer. This treatment however is associated with significant acute and late toxicity with xerostomia and dysphagia severely implicating the patient's quality of life. With highly conformal radiotherapy techniques it is possible to decrease de dose to the organs at risk while maintaining adequate doses to the tumour. In order to adequately register the effect of these techniques it is imperative to obtain standardized information on the acute and late treatment effects. With this study the investigators want to evaluate this toxicity using standardized and validated questionnaires during follow-up. This data will then be correlated to the doses delivered to the specific organs at risk.

Introduction Radiotherapy is one of the main curative treatment options in advanced head and neck cancer. With the introduction of altered fractionation schedules and concurrent chemotherapy locoregional control numbers and overall survival have improved significantly. This has come at the cost of excess in acute and late toxicity. The steep dose gradients associated with more conformal radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows us to maintain adequate coverage of the target volume while reducing the dose to the surrounding normal tissues, thus potentially sparing these from excess acute and late toxicity. However to accurately evaluate the value of these new techniques documentation of treatment related toxicity and quality of life is essential. Standardized quality of life scoring systems have been developed for this purpose. Especially xerostomia is very hard to evaluate, although it remains an important issue in the follow-up of these patients.

Purpose In this study the investigators want to analyze treatment related toxicity, with special emphasis on xerostomia and dysphagia in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer by presenting them with standardized quality of life questionnaires at well defined points after treatment (2 months, six months, one year ,two years after RT). The result of these questionnaires will then be correlated to treatment data.

Study Design The investigators will include all patient which are in follow-up after primary (chemo-)radiotherapy for head and neck cancer for a period 4 years. At well defined time points after primary (chemo-)radiotherapy for head and neck cancer the investigators will ask the patient to fill in standardized questionnaires compromising of the EORTC QLQ H&N35 questionnaire, the university of Michigan Xerostomia questionnaire (XQ) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory. The treating physician will score the toxicity using the RTOG/EORTC late toxicity scoring system and the functional oral intake scale (FOIS).

This toxicity data will then be analyzed and correlated with treatment data. Special interest will go to the relationship between the presence of xerostomia and the doses delivered to subvolumes of the parotid glands, the submandibular glands and oral cavity.

Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Probability Sample

Patients treated with primary (chemo-)radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma up to 70-72 Gy.

  • Head and Neck Neoplasms
  • Xerostomia
  • Deglutition Disorders
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
200
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December 2016   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx.
  • Stage T1-4,N0-3; for cancer of the glottis T3-4 or TxN1-3
  • Decision for curative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy made by a multidisciplinary group of head and neck tumors.
  • >18 years of age

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Previous surgery of the primary tumor or lymph nodes
  • Tumour recurrence, locoregional or distant
  • Mental condition rendering the patient unable to understand or fill in the questionnaires
Both
18 Years and older
No
Belgium
 
NCT01621048
s54403
No
Dr. Sandra Nuyts, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven
Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven
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Principal Investigator: Sandra Nuyts, M.D., Ph.D Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Gasthuisberg Leuven
Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven
March 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP