GlideScope®Video Laryngoscope for Difficult Intubation: Implication of the Size of Blade

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jin-Tae Kim, Seoul National University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01616771
First received: April 30, 2012
Last updated: June 11, 2012
Last verified: June 2012

April 30, 2012
June 11, 2012
February 2011
January 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
The differences between the glottis view of Glidescope and that of direct laryngoscopy [ Time Frame: up to 1 day of surgery ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Initial laryngoscopic view was scored using Macintosh laryngoscope. Then, second laryngoscopic view was scored using GV with similar-size blade of initial Macintosh laryngoscopy.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01616771 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
The differences between the glottis view with original-size glidescope and that with smaller-size glidescope [ Time Frame: up to 1day of surgery ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
The last laryngoscopic view was scored using glidescope with smaller-size blade.
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
GlideScope®Video Laryngoscope for Difficult Intubation: Implication of the Size of Blade
GlideScope®Video Laryngoscope for Difficult Intubation: Implication of the Size of Blade

The investigators evaluated the usefulness of the Glidescope(GVL) compared with direct laryngoscopy in patients whose airway management are anticipated difficult (C&L grade ≥3) by comparing the laryngoscopic view. Also, the investigators compared the effectiveness of smaller-size blade of GVL (GVLs) with standard blade of GVL selected by patient's weight (GVLw) in the same patients.

We assumed that smaller sized GVL can slide more angulated along the tongue, so the tip of a blade can be placed more anterior and cephalad. The angle of camera would be optimized by inserting the blade further with the blade tip directed toward the larynx. This optimization may be more remarkable with smaller blade because it can be inserted with rotation. Furthermore, the location and the angle of camera are different according to GVL blade size. Considering that patient with difficult airway has hypognathia and more cephalad larynx, it may be helpful with smaller sized GVL (GVLs) rather than GVL selected by weight (GVLw) for improvement of laryngoscopic view in patients with difficult airways. We hypothesized that GVLs can provide better laryngoscopic view than GVLw and DL in patient with difficult airway.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Intubation; Difficult
Device: laryngoscopy
evaluation of laryngoscopic view using 2 different sized GlideScope® videolaryngoscopy (GVL)
Other Name: GlideScope® videolaryngoscopy
  • Active Comparator: smaller sized GVL
    Intervention: Device: laryngoscopy
  • Experimental: weight based sized GVL
    Intervention: Device: laryngoscopy
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
24
January 2012
January 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients whose C&L grade were over 3 in previous anesthetic records.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with pulmonary aspiration, increased intracranial pressure, and severe cardiovascular disease
Both
Not Provided
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Not Provided
 
NCT01616771
H-1111-037-385
No
Jin-Tae Kim, Seoul National University Hospital
Seoul National University Hospital
Not Provided
Study Director: Jin-Tae Kim, professor Seoul National University Hospital
Seoul National University Hospital
June 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP