Social Medical Progression of Coronary Heart Disease With Associated Psychosocial Comorbidity -Interval Rehabilitation. (SINKO)

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified April 2012 by Clinic Roderbirken
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Clinic Roderbirken
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01589536
First received: March 2, 2012
Last updated: May 1, 2012
Last verified: April 2012

March 2, 2012
May 1, 2012
October 2011
December 2015   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Improvement of the social medical progression of coronary heart disease with associated psychosocial comorbidity by the use of interval rehabilitaion [ Time Frame: 24 months after including study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Reducing the rate of disability pension of 18%of 9% by interval-rehabilitation with aftercare.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01589536 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Improvement of the social medical progression of coronary heart disease with associated psychosocial comorbidity by the use of interval rehabilitaion [ Time Frame: 24 months after including study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Reduction of cardiovascular events, including deaths Improving the risk profile Improvement of health-related quality of life Improvement of mental comorbidity
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Social Medical Progression of Coronary Heart Disease With Associated Psychosocial Comorbidity -Interval Rehabilitation.
Improvement of the Social Medical Progression of Coronary Heart Disease With Associated Psychosocial Comorbidity by the Use of Interval Rehabilitation.

The purpose of the study is to verfiy the hypothesis if a short intensive psychocardiological interval-intervention, combined with a structured follow up, decreases the rate of disability retirements caused by psychosocial co-morbidity of patients with coronary heart disease.

The purpose of the study is to verfiy the hypothesis if a short intensive psychocardiological interval intervention, combined with a structured follow up, decreases the rate of disability retirements caused by psychosocial co-morbidity of patients with coronary heart disease.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Cardiovascular Events
Other: interval-rehabilitation
The Patients in the intervention group receive a Stationary psychocardiological interval-rehabilitation.The Interval rehabilitation is divided into individual psychological therapy with focus of Behavior therapy and relaxation therapy.
Other Names:
  • psychocardiological
  • interval rehabilitation
  • Roderbirken
  • comorbidity
  • sarah
  • Experimental: Interventiongroup
    A Stationary psychocardiological interval-rehabilitation.
    Intervention: Other: interval-rehabilitation
  • No Intervention: controlgroup
    The Patients in the control group receive a personal recommendation concerning psychotherapy outpatient counseling and therapy services at home and take therapeutic help.
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
480
December 2016
December 2015   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Disease-related psychosocial morbidity
  • not a disability retirements
  • Insured with the German Rheinland pension (deutsche Rentenversicherung Rheinland)
  • Sufficient language skills
  • Age 18-58

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Acute cardiac decompensation
  • consuming the underlying disease
  • psychotic disorder
  • Acute suicidality
  • pregnancy
Both
18 Years to 58 Years
No
Germany
 
NCT01589536
10001
Yes
Clinic Roderbirken
Clinic Roderbirken
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Wolfgang Mayer-Berger, MD Clinic Roderbirken
Clinic Roderbirken
April 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP