Fast Muscle Activation and Stepping Training (FAST) Post-stroke

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified May 2014 by University of British Columbia
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01573585
First received: April 5, 2012
Last updated: May 26, 2014
Last verified: May 2014

April 5, 2012
May 26, 2014
November 2012
March 2017   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Community Balance and Mobility Scale [ Time Frame: Pre treatment and Post treatment (6 weeks) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01573585 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Gait assessment [ Time Frame: Pre treatment, Post treatment (6 weeks) and Retention (+1 month after treatment) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Self selected speed and changes in electromyography
  • Physiological balance assessment by internal and external perturbations [ Time Frame: Pre treatment, Post treatment (6 weeks) and Retention (+1 month after treatment) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Electromyography and Center of pressure changes
  • Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale [ Time Frame: Pre treatment, Post treatment (6 weeks) and Retention (+1 month after treatment) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Community Balance and Mobility Scale [ Time Frame: Post treatment and Retention (+1 month after treatment) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Fast Muscle Activation and Stepping Training (FAST) Post-stroke
Effectiveness of Fast Muscle Activation and Stepping Training (FAST) on Balance and Mobility Post-stroke

The purpose of this study is to determine whether FAST (Fast muscle Activation and Stepping Training) exercises will improve walking balance in individuals after stroke to a greater extent than usual care.

Hypothesis: The primary hypothesis is that improvements in walking balance will be larger following 12 sessions of FAST exercise retraining compared to usual care in persons in the sub-acute phase after stroke.

It is estimated that 75-80% of individuals who have had a stroke will survive the acute event and be left with residual disability. Regaining independence in standing and walking is of utmost importance for patients recovering from stroke. Walking balance requires muscles in the legs and trunk to contract quickly if people lose their balance. Physical therapy plays a key role in the rehabilitation of walking balance in individuals after stroke. Given that maintaining one's balance requires fast muscle activity, rehabilitation post-stroke should focus on speed of movement. Thus we are proposing to compare a program that emphasizes speed of movement, Fast muscle Activation and Stepping Training versus an active control (usual care).

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Stroke
  • Hemiparesis
  • Behavioral: Usual Care
    The Usual Care program will consist of 2 sessions a week for 45 minutes for a 6 week duration.
  • Behavioral: FAST protocol
    The Fast muscle activation and Stepping Training (FAST protocol) will be exercises emphasizing speed, small squats and protective steps, that will be progressed. This program will be 2 sessions a week for 45 minutes for 6 weeks in duration.
  • Active Comparator: Usual care
    The usual care will consist of strength training, endurance, range of motion, patient education, weight shifting in standing and gait re-training.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Usual Care
  • Experimental: FAST protocol
    The Fast muscle activation and stepping training will be the Experimental arm of this trial. This program will be exercises emphasizing speed of movement.
    Intervention: Behavioral: FAST protocol
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
60
June 2017
March 2017   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Study population: Subjects with a diagnosis of stroke

Inclusion Criteria:

  • first stroke (<6 months ago)
  • presence of hemiparesis in the lower extremity
  • minimum Berg Balance Score (BBS) of 30/56
  • cognitive ability to give informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • bilateral stroke, or a previous stroke in the other hemisphere
  • severe co-morbidity that is likely to dominate the pattern of care
  • co-existing peripheral neuropathies or disorders of the vestibular apparatus
  • musculoskeletal problems
  • global aphasia or receptive aphasia
Both
19 Years and older
No
Contact: Kimberly Miller, PhD 604-827-5372 kimberly.miller@ubc.ca
Canada
 
NCT01573585
H12-00837
No
University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
Principal Investigator: S. Jayne Garland, PT, PhD University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
May 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP