Trial of Repeated Analgesia With Kangaroo Care (TRAKC)

This study is not yet open for participant recruitment.
Verified March 2012 by IWK Health Centre
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation
The Mayday Fund
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Celeste Johnston, IWK Health Centre
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01561547
First received: March 8, 2012
Last updated: March 22, 2012
Last verified: March 2012

March 8, 2012
March 22, 2012
June 2012
December 2015   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) [ Time Frame: At the moment of painful procedure ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
The PIPP is a composite measure of procedural pain and is based on changes from baseline in maximum heart rate and minimum oxygen saturation, and the duration of three facial actions. Data are analyzed in 30 second blocks from the moment the painful procedure begins. Time to return to baseline will also be noted. Scoring is done by assessors blind to the purpose of the study and group assignment.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01561547 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Neurobehavioral Assessment of Preterm Infants (NAPI) [ Time Frame: 32, 36 and 40 weeks gestational age ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Two scales of the NAPI will be scored by person blinded to the intervention. These are 1) Motor Development and Vigour and 2) Alertness and Orientation
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Trial of Repeated Analgesia With Kangaroo Care
Maternal Analgesia for Procedural Pain in Preterm Neonates: Does It Remain Efficacious?

Mothers can provide pain relief to their newborns, even in the context of intensive neonatal care. There is a recent accumulation of data, being analyzed by ourselves in a Cochrane review, that mothers holding their infants in a bare-chested skin-to-skin position, known as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC), is effective in diminishing pain response during a single painful procedure. While evidence is compelling, leading to recommendations for its use, to date there is not a single study on the repeated efficacy to reduce pain. Current guidelines recommend sweet taste for minor painful procedures. Although there is some controversy about its continued use in this population based on one study with negative neurodevelopmental outcomes as well as its potential interaction with dopaminergic development, oral sucrose (sweet taste) remains efficacious in decreasing pain response over several weeks. The combination of KMC and sucrose is marginally more potent, but again, long term use remains unstudied.

AIMS. To test the repeated efficacy in diminishing pain from heel lance of KMC compared to usual care (sucrose), and of KMC in combination with sucrose by examining each condition at least three times during NICU stay. A secondary aim is to compare these interventions on neurodevelopment at discharge from the NICU.

Not Provided
Interventional
Phase 3
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Pain
  • Development
  • Behavioral: Kangaroo Mother Care
    Infant wearing only diaper is held in skin-to-skin contact with mother with flannel blanket around both mother and infant. removal.
  • Dietary Supplement: Sucrose
    24% sucrose in volumes between .05 to 2 ml depending on weight of the infant, is inserted by dropper into the infants mouth two minutes before and/or during the painful procedure with up to 3 doses.
  • Experimental: Kangaroo Mother Care
    Infant is held in skin-to-skin contact with mother at least 15 minutes prior to painful procedure, remains in that position throughout the procedure and after the procedure at least until heart rate returns to baseline. Infant is given sterile water by mouth. This is for every heel lance and venipuncture, and if possible for tape removal.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Kangaroo Mother Care
  • Active Comparator: Sucrose
    Two minutes before the painful procedure and at the moment of the procedure, the infant will be given 24% sucrose by mouth. The volume is determined by body weight and is not important in terms of efficacy, it is the percentage of sweetness that is important.
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: Sucrose
  • Experimental: Combination Kangaroo Mother Care and Sucrose
    Infant is held in skin-to-skin contact with mother at least 15 minutes prior to painful procedure, remains in that position throughout the procedure and after the procedure at least until heart rate returns to baseline. Infant is given sucrose water by mouth. This is for every heel lance and venipuncture, and if possible for tape removal.
    Interventions:
    • Behavioral: Kangaroo Mother Care
    • Dietary Supplement: Sucrose

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Not yet recruiting
285
Not Provided
December 2015   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • less than 36.0 weeks gestational age
  • mother is generally available to provide kangaroo mother care

Exclusion Criteria:

  • narcotic analgesics
  • surgery in past 48 hrs
  • major congenital anomalies
Both
Not Provided
No
Contact: Marsha Campbell-Yeo, RN, NNP, PhD (902) 470-7455 Marsha.CampbellYeo@iwk.nshealth.ca
Contact: Kim Caddell, RN, BS (902)4706704 Kim Caddell <kim.caddell@iwk.nshealth.ca>
Canada
 
NCT01561547
TRAKC, CIHR-NSHRF-Mayday RPP 2446
No
Celeste Johnston, IWK Health Centre
IWK Health Centre
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
  • Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation
  • The Mayday Fund
Principal Investigator: Celeste Johnston, RN, DEd IWK Health Centre
Study Director: Marsha Campbell-Yeo, RN, NNP, PhD IWK Health Centre
IWK Health Centre
March 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP