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Dietary Vitamin A Requirement in Chinese Children and the New Technology of Dietary Assessment

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
ShiYan Centre for Disease Control and Prevention
Tufts Medical Center
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Xiufa Sun, Huazhong University of Science and Technology
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01559766
First received: March 19, 2012
Last updated: March 20, 2012
Last verified: March 2012

March 19, 2012
March 20, 2012
July 2009
July 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01559766 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Dietary Vitamin A Requirement in Chinese Children and the New Technology of Dietary Assessment
Estimating Dietary Vitamin A Requirement in Chinese Children by Stable-isotope Dilution Technique

Vitamin A deficiency remains a major public health problem in developing country worldwide. Young Children are considered to be at greatest risk of deficiency. However, there is little information on the vitamin A requirement of Chinese children. In the present study, about 400 children aged between 4 and 9 years old in a kindergarten and an elementary school of Shiyan City were screened before admission by questionnaire and anthropometric measurement. The vitamin A status of children was assessed by serum vitamin A level, relative dosage reaction and stable-isotope dilution technique. At the same time, their dietary vitamin A intakes were estimated by weighted-food dietary survey. The dietary vitamin A requirement in young children was determined on the basis of dietary vitamin A intakes in Children with adequate vitamin A level.

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Observational
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
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Retention:   Samples Without DNA
Description:

serum

Non-Probability Sample

The study was carried out in a kindergarten and an elementary school in Shiyan city, Hubei province of China. Initially, 201 kindergarten children (4-6 years old) and 202 grade children (7-9 years old) were subjected to a questionnaire survey on personal information, medical history and dietary habits including dietary supplements.ongoing or previous illnesses, having taken nutritional supplements within 3 months, positive results in the fat absorption test or parasite test, increased level of CRP (> 8 mg/L), or lower serum level of retinol (<1.40 umol/L), and higher ratio in relative dosage reaction test(>20%) .After the screening, 123 children were selected and completed the study, but 60 subjects were randomly selected for the DRD test to evaluate liver vitamin A storage.

Vitamin A Deficiency
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  • 4-6 years old group
  • 7-9 years old group
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
403
September 2010
July 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • well-nourished children with normal serum retinol(>=1.40umol/L)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • ongoing or previous illnesses,
  • having taken nutritional supplements within 3 months,
  • positive results in the fat absorption test or parasite test,
  • increased level of CRP (> 8 mg/L), or
  • lower serum level of retinol (< 1.40 umol/L)
Both
4 Years to 9 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
China
 
NCT01559766
No.2008BAI58B03
Yes
Xiufa Sun, Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Huazhong University of Science and Technology
  • ShiYan Centre for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Tufts Medical Center
Principal Investigator: Xiufa Sun, BS Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Huazhong University of Science and Technology
March 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP