Reducing Energy Density by Different Methods to Decrease Energy Intake

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Barbara J. Rolls, Penn State University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01470300
First received: November 9, 2011
Last updated: November 10, 2011
Last verified: November 2011

November 9, 2011
November 10, 2011
September 2010
May 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Energy intake [ Time Frame: 1 month ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01470300 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Food intake [ Time Frame: 1 month ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Reducing Energy Density by Different Methods to Decrease Energy Intake
Reducing Energy Density by Different Methods to Decrease Energy Intake

The purpose of this research is to investigate how using different methods to reduce the energy density of entrees affects daily energy intake in adults. It is hypothesized that reducing the energy density of entrees will decrease energy intake. It is also hypothesized that reducing the energy density by incorporating fruit and vegetables will decrease energy intake more than reducing the energy density by decreasing fat content or adding plain water.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Obesity
Other: Energy density feeding study
In a crossover design, adults are served breakfast, lunch, and dinner, 1 day a week for 4 weeks. Meal entrees will vary in energy density (100% and 80%) and the method used to reduce the energy density (added fruit & vegetables, decreased fat, added plain water).
  • Experimental: Standard ED
    100% energy density
    Intervention: Other: Energy density feeding study
  • Experimental: Reduced ED - F/V
    80% energy density by adding fruit and vegetables
    Intervention: Other: Energy density feeding study
  • Experimental: Reduced ED - Fat
    80% energy density by decreasing fat
    Intervention: Other: Energy density feeding study
  • Experimental: Reduced ED - Plain water
    80% energy density by adding plain water
    Intervention: Other: Energy density feeding study
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
62
May 2011
May 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults from Penn State and surrounding community

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Currently dieting
  • Food allergies
Both
20 Years to 45 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01470300
FoodED401, R37DK039177-19, 2R01DK059853-10
No
Barbara J. Rolls, Penn State University
Penn State University
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Principal Investigator: Barbara J Rolls Penn State University
Penn State University
November 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP