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Position Changes During Colonoscope Insertion Increases Patient Comfort

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01433939
First received: September 12, 2011
Last updated: March 12, 2014
Last verified: March 2014

September 12, 2011
March 12, 2014
September 2011
May 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intensity and frequency of abdominal pain [ Time Frame: 30min ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Abdominal pain during colonoscopy.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01433939 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Position Changes During Colonoscope Insertion Increases Patient Comfort
Position Changes During Colonoscope Insertion Increases Patient Comfort: a Prospective Trial

The investigators wish to study the effects of position changes during colonoscope insertion on patient comfort. The investigators hypothesize that early position changes would reduce colonoscope loop formation and patient discomfort.

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Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Probability Sample

Patients referred to gastroenterologists for colonoscopy.

Colonoscopy Technique
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Active, not recruiting
200
September 2014
May 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • age 19 years or older
  • outpatient colonoscopy

Exclusion Criteria:

  • inpatient
  • unable to provide informed consent
  • previous bowel resection, inflammatory bowel disease
  • musculoskeletal disorder or other mobility issues limiting effective patient position changes.
  • inadequate bowel preparation
Both
19 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT01433939
H11-01597
No
University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Jennifer Telford, MD The University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
March 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP