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Augmenting Language Therapy for Aphasia: Levodopa

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
U.S. Department of Education
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Leora Cherney, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01429077
First received: August 2, 2011
Last updated: November 27, 2013
Last verified: November 2013

August 2, 2011
November 27, 2013
October 2007
March 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Language Quotient (LQ) on the Western Aphasia Battery [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline in Western Aphasia Battery LQ at 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Includes a measure of auditory comprehension, oral expression, reading and written expression skills.

The scale ranges from 1 - 100 with 100 being better. The change or gain score from baseline to immediately post-treatment (at 6 weeks) is reported. The larger the change score, the greater the improvement.

Aphasia Quotient (AQ) on the Western Aphasia Battery [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline in Western Aphasia Battery AQ at 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01429077 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Functional Communication Skills [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline in functional communication skills at 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Scores derived from language sample analyses
  • Participation in Everyday Activities [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline in participation in everyday activities at 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measures on CETI, QCL,BOSS, CCRSA.
  • Western Aphasia Battery - Reading and Writing Scores [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline in Western Aphasia Battery Reading and Writing scores at 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient (Maintenance) [ Time Frame: Change in Western Aphasia Battery AQ from 6 weeks to 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Western Aphasia Battery Reading and Writing Scores (Maintenance) [ Time Frame: Change in WAB Reading and Writing Skills from 6 weeks to 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Functional Communication Skills (Maintenance) [ Time Frame: Change in functional communication skills from 6 weeks to 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Participation in Everyday Activities (Maintenance) [ Time Frame: Change in participation in everyday activities from 6 weeks to 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Augmenting Language Therapy for Aphasia: Levodopa
Augmenting Language Therapy for Aphasia: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Levodopa in Combination With Speech-Language Therapy

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the medication levodopa, in combination with speech-language treatment, on the language outcome of study subjects with nonfluent aphasia (i.e. difficulty with the comprehension and expression of spoken and written language) following a stroke.

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the most common cause of disability in the United States. According to the American Stroke Association, the prevalence of stroke in the U.S. is approximately 4.8 million with approximately 700,000 additional strokes occurring annually. Approximately 150,000 to 250,000 stroke survivors becoming severely and permanently disabled each year.

A common neurological deficit among stroke survivors, and thus a substantial contributor to post-stroke disability, is aphasia. The loss of, or difficulty with language is extremely debilitating and has enormous social and economic impact on quality of life. Presently, the only treatment available for persons with aphasia is speech-language rehabilitation.

With rehabilitation only, however, many patients achieve a less than satisfactory improvement in speech-language function, and thus are left with significant disability.

To enhance motor and language recovery in patients with neurological impairments, interest in the use of novel biological therapies, including pharmacological agents, has recently emerged. There is preliminary evidence that increased levels of dopamine, in combination with language treatment, may improve the deficits of aphasia following stroke. Most studies have investigated the adjunctive effects of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine, with mixed results. However, new evidence is suggesting that levodopa, a precursor to dopamine, may be more effective in promoting language learning.

This study proposes to evaluate the effectiveness of levodopa in study subjects with Broca's aphasia after stroke, delivered concurrent with speech-language rehabilitation.

The language changes in subjects who receive speech and language therapy combined with levodopa will be compared to that of subjects who receive the same speech-language rehabilitation but with a placebo (i.e. a pill that does not contain the study drug, levodopa). The two study groups will be compared to determine the degree to which improvements in language performance occur and the degree to which they are maintained over time.

The protocol is double-blind: neither subjects nor researchers will know whether a subject took levodopa or placebo until the study's conclusion.

Interventional
Phase 2
Phase 3
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Nonfluent Aphasia
  • Stroke
  • Drug: levodopa/carbidopa
    The study drug (100 mg levodopa / 25 mg carbidopa), is received orally 30-45 minutes before 1 hour of speech-language treatment, five days a week, for six weeks.
    Other Name: Sinemet
  • Drug: Placebo comparator
    The placebo comparator (inactive pill) is received orally 30-45 minutes before 1 hour of speech-language treatment, five days a week, for six weeks.
  • Active Comparator: Levodopa/carbidopa
    The study drug (100 mg levodopa / 25 mg carbidopa), is received orally 30-45 minutes before 1 hour of speech-language treatment, five days a week, for six weeks.
    Intervention: Drug: levodopa/carbidopa
  • Placebo Comparator: Inactive pill
    The placebo comparator (inactive pill) is received orally 30-45 minutes before 1 hour of speech-language treatment, five days a week, for six weeks.
    Intervention: Drug: Placebo comparator
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
36
March 2012
March 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • A single unilateral left-hemisphere stroke
  • Nonfluent aphasia, with a mean length of utterance of 0-4 words and an Aphasia Quotient between 20 and 75 on the Western Aphasia Battery
  • Age 21 or older.
  • At least 6 months post-stroke
  • Able to comply with the study protocol
  • Premorbidly right-handed, as determined by the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory
  • Fluent in English premorbidly
  • Completed at least 8th grade education

Exclusion Criteria:

  • More than one stroke
  • Any other neurological condition that could potentially affect cognition or speech.
  • Global aphasia or inability to participate in routine speech therapy.
  • Major active psychiatric illness that may interfere with required study procedures.
  • Untreated or inadequately treated depression.
  • Has started taking a potentially confounding central nervous system (CNS) drug within the previous 2 months.
  • Current abuse of alcohol or drugs
  • Nursing a child or pregnant
  • Participation in another drug, device or biologics trial within the preceding 90 days
  • Unable to understand, cooperate or comply with study procedures
  • Significant visual or auditory impairment
  • History of sensitivity to ergot derivatives.
  • Active medical illness or current medication that precludes safe participation in this study.
Both
21 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01429077
H133G070074
No
Leora Cherney, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago
U.S. Department of Education
Not Provided
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago
November 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP