Time, Touch, Attention and the Autonomic Nervous System

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Kathi J. Kemper, Wake Forest University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01428674
First received: August 30, 2011
Last updated: September 2, 2011
Last verified: September 2011

August 30, 2011
September 2, 2011
February 2011
June 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Change in Heart Rate Variability from pre-intervention period to intervention period [ Time Frame: continuous monitoring for 10 min before intervention and during 10 or 20 minute intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Change in Respiratory Rate from pre-intervention period to intervention period [ Time Frame: continuous monitoring for 10 minutes before intervention and during 10 or 20 minute intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01428674 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Perceived Stress, Relaxation, Peacefulness [ Time Frame: baseline, after a 10 minute rest period, before 10 or 20 minute intervention, immediately after intervention, 20 minutes after intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Time, Touch, Attention and the Autonomic Nervous System
The Impact of Interpersonal Mindful Compassion on Autonomic Nervous System Function

The purpose of this study is to describe the onset, duration and dose-response of interpersonal mindful compassion on respiratory rate and heart rate variability in healthy adults in order to prepare for research evaluating the impact of this intervention in patient populations and to prepare for basic research investigating the CNS mechanisms for observed effects.

Previous research has found that mindfulness meditation, including mindful compassion, results in autonomic changes in the practitioner. Emerging neuroscience of dyadic interactions suggests that through the effects of mirror neuron isopraxis, one person's physiologic state may be mirrored by another. However, no research has directly evaluated the impact of one person's mindful compassion on another person's autonomic activity. This study paves the way for an entirely new avenue of research inquiry.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Stress
  • Other: Interpersonal Mindful Compassion with Touch
    A practitioner lightly touches the participant on the hands, arms, shoulders, lower legs and feet while extending loving kindness to the participant.
  • Other: Reading while extending loving kindness
    The practitioner sits in a room with the participant, pretending to read, while extending loving kindness to the participant.
  • Experimental: 10 minutes reading
    Intervention: Other: Reading while extending loving kindness
  • Experimental: 20 minutes touch
    Intervention: Other: Interpersonal Mindful Compassion with Touch
  • Experimental: 20 minutes reading
    Intervention: Other: Reading while extending loving kindness
  • Experimental: 10 minutes touch
    Intervention: Other: Interpersonal Mindful Compassion with Touch
Kemper KJ, Shaltout HA. Non-verbal communication of compassion: measuring psychophysiologic effects. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011 Dec 20;11:132. PubMed PMID: 22185349; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3260157.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
20
June 2011
June 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy subjects age 18 - 40

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Taking beta blocker medication
Both
18 Years to 40 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Not Provided
 
NCT01428674
WFUIRB00015699
Yes
Kathi J. Kemper, Wake Forest University
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Kathi J Kemper, MD Wake Forest School of Medicine
Wake Forest School of Medicine
September 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP