Minimal Invasive Procedure for Myocardial Infarction (MIMI)

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University Hospital, Grenoble
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Centre Hospitalier de la Région d'Annecy
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01360242
First received: April 28, 2011
Last updated: January 9, 2013
Last verified: January 2013

April 28, 2011
January 9, 2013
June 2011
December 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
The primary endpoint is the extent of MVO as assessed by CMRI, expressed as the ratio of MVO/left ventricular mass, in the MIMI and conventional groups. [ Time Frame: day of performing CMRI (between the fourth and the seventh day after randomization) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

The primary end-point will be reviewed by an independent CMRI core laboratory blinded to the group and the procedure.

MVO is defined as a hypoenhanced subendocardial area in the infarction core 2 or 10 minutes after contrast injection (dark zone). The total myocardial infarction is defined as the sum of hypoenhanced (dark zone) and hyperenhanced (white zone) signals 10 minutes after contrast injection. The CMRI procedure will be standardised with a specific documentation.

Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01360242 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Comparison of the MIMI approach and the conventional strategy on TIMI flow, myocardial blush, and ST-segment evolution before and after the first procedure. [ Time Frame: before and 60-90 minutes after the first procedure ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measurements: TIMI flow grade and TIMI frame count (a more sophisticated method for measuring the flow) at the end of the procedure; blush (a more precise evaluation than TIMI flow on angiography); and ST-segment evolution on the electrocardiogram (ECG) before and 60-90 minutes after the first procedure (core laboratory).
  • To measure TIMI flow and myocardial blush at the beginning and at end of the second procedure in the MIMI group, and to compare with those obtained at the end of the first procedure. [ Time Frame: at the beginning and one minute after the end of the second procedure ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measurements: TIMI flow grade, TIMI frame count, and blush at the beginning and at the end of the second procedure.
  • Thrombus burden assessment, and culprit artery diameter between each procedure in the MIMI group [ Time Frame: during each procedure (0-48 hours) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measurements: Thrombus volume and artery diameter at the thrombus location during the first and second procedure, and diameter of the implanted stent (done at the core laboratory).
  • Assessment of the ST-segment after the second procedure in the MIMI group [ Time Frame: at the beginning (puncture) and 60-90 min after the end of the second procedure ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measurements: Maximal ST-segment elevation before and 60-90 minutes after the second procedure (done at the core laboratory).
  • Assessment of the impact of the MIMI procedure on hospital clinical events, infarction size (on CMRI) and complications due to the second procedure. [ Time Frame: from randomisation to an expected average 4 days stay before hospital discharge ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

    The following hospital critical events and complications that occur after the first procedure will be analyzed: cardiogenic shock, acute pulmonary oedema, recurrent myocardial infarction, culprit artery re-occlusion, stroke, major bleeding [Bovill et al. 1991], evaluation of no flow, coronary dissection, recurrent myocardial infarction, chest pain, decelerating angio flow, recurrent ST elevation, troponin elevation, severe renal insufficiency, access site bleeding, and access artery occlusion.

    Measurement: CMRI infarction size.

  • Assessment of the clinical impact of the MIMI procedure at 6 months [ Time Frame: 6 months after randomization ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Measurements: In both groups, follow-up will be undertaken at 6 months by a phone call to the general practitioner, cardiologist or patient, to report the occurrence of: death, recurrent myocardial infarction, hospitalization(s) for cardiac insufficiency, and unscheduled revascularisation.
  • Assessment of the microcirculatory resistance in patients in whom a pressure endocoronary wire was used. [ Time Frame: after each procedure (0-48 hours) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measurement: Index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) just after stenting (first procedure for the conventional group and second procedure for the MIMI group)
  • Hospitalization duration for both procedures [ Time Frame: expected average time from randomisation to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge of 4 days ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measurements: Number of days in ICU
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Minimal Invasive Procedure for Myocardial Infarction
Patients Presenting With Acute STEMI Treated With Primary PCI : Comparison of the Impact of the MIMI Approach With a Conventional Strategy of Immediate Stenting

In the setting of primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI), the investigators hypothesize that a 24-48 hour delay strategy of stenting after successful thrombus aspiration and establishment of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI)-3 flow with optimal antithrombotic therapy may decrease the risk of MicroVascular Obstruction (MVO) as assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI).

Primary PCI is the reperfusion therapy of choice in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) [Van de Werf et al. 2008; Kushner et al. 2009]. The first objective in primary PCI is to restore TIMI-3 flow. However, despite restoration of TIMI-3 flow, myocardial reperfusion remains suboptimal in a significant proportion of patients, predominantly as a consequence of the so called "myocardial non-reperfusion phenomenon", "low/no-reflow phenomenon" or MVO. This, in turn, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality [Brodie et al. 2005; Bruder et al. 2008; Hombach et al. 2005; Nijveldt et al. 2008; Thiele et al. 2008; Wu et al. 1998]. Although TIMI flow is well assessed by angiography, contrast-enhanced CMRI remains the gold standard in the assessment of MVO. Indeed, the presence and extent of hypoenhanced areas have been shown to be associated with a poor outcome [Bruder et al. 2008; Hombach et al. 2005; Nijveldt et al. 2008; Wu et al. 1998].

There is now a large body of evidence to suggest that even in patients with TIMI-3 flow on angiography, as many as 60% of these patients will subsequently exhibit MVO with CMRI [Brodie et al. 2005; Bruder et al. 2008; Hombach et al. 2005; Nijveldt et al. 2008; Thiele et al. 2008; Wu et al. 1998]. Our knowledge of the mechanisms of MVO occurrence as well as measures to reduce MVO has been considerably enhanced by recent publications. For instance, Sianos et al. [2007] demonstrated that the thrombus burden at the time of angiography is an independent predictor of MVO extension and 2-year mortality. Furthermore, Isaaz et al. [2006] recommended a two-step strategy as a means of minimising the risk of MVO, with the first step consisting of TIMI-3 flow restoration, followed 2-6 days later by further angiography to determine the therapeutic strategy of choice (PCI, cardiac surgery, or medical treatment: 67%, 25%, and 8% respectively). Meneveau et al. [2009] also adopted a two-step strategy in a small cohort of STEMI patients with TIMI-3 flow and ST-segment regression at the time of the procedure. They demonstrated that a 24-hour delay in stent implantation led to a higher rate of procedural success than immediate stenting. Isaaz et al. [2006] and Meneveau et al. [2009] also reported a decreased thrombus burden and no culprit-artery re-occlusion between the first and the second procedure.

Both the Thrombus Aspiration during Percutaneous coronary intervention in Acute myocardial infarction Study (TAPAS) [Svilaas et al. 2008] and the thrombectomy with EXPort catheter in Infarct-Related Artery during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (EXPIRA) [Sardella et al. 2009] studies demonstrated the benefits of thrombus aspiration as the first step in primary PCI prior to either ballooning or direct stenting. However, as the effects of stenting upon MVO in the setting of acute STEMI remain poorly understood, we propose a randomized study to evaluate the benefits of a 24-48-hour delay in stent implantation compared to immediate stenting in patients presenting with acute STEMI who will undergo primary PCI.

Interventional
Phase 3
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction
  • Procedure: MIMI procedure (two-step strategy)
    A second coronary angiogram is performed 24-48 hours later and the physician is free to decide on the best treatment, i.e. surgery, medical treatment, or stent implantation (drug-eluting stent if indicated for on-label patients). If stenting is required and the thrombus is still too large (greater than twice the artery width), the physician could postpone stent implantation for days or weeks.
    Other Names:
    • Delayed angioplasty
    • Two-step strategy
  • Procedure: Immediate Stenting (one-step strategy)
    The physician is encouraged to implant a stent after the thrombus aspiration (drug-eluting stent if indicated for on-label patients).
    Other Name: Immediate Angioplasty
  • Active Comparator: MIMI procedure (two-step strategy)
    Thrombus aspiration is performed to achieve TIMI-3 flow. Once TIMI-3 flow is restored and sustained for > 10 minutes, the initial procedure is stopped regardless of the presence of any residual stenosis. A second coronary angiogram is performed 24-48 hours later and the physician is free to decide on the best treatment, i.e. surgery, medical treatment, or stent implantation (drug-eluting stent if indicated for on-label patients). If stenting is required and the thrombus is still too large (greater than twice the artery width), the physician could postpone stent implantation for days or weeks.
    Intervention: Procedure: MIMI procedure (two-step strategy)
  • Sham Comparator: Immediate Stenting (one-step strategy)
    The physician is encouraged to implant a stent after the thrombus aspiration (drug-eluting stent if indicated for on-label patients).
    Intervention: Procedure: Immediate Stenting (one-step strategy)

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Active, not recruiting
160
June 2013
December 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with acute STEMI presenting within 12 hours of symptom onset, requiring a primary percutaneous coronary intervention; and written informed consent.
  • Patients will be randomized during the angiography if the initial TIMI flow is 0 or 1 in a major artery and if TIMI-3 flow can be restored after thrombus aspiration and sustained for 10 minutes.
  • Acute STEMI is defined as typical chest pain with 30 minutes of sustained ST-segment elevation >1 mm in two or more consecutive limb leads or >2 mm in two or more precordial leads in the ECG. Major artery is defined as the proximal or mid segment of the left descending artery, the proximal segment of the circumflex artery (before the first marginal), or the right coronary artery before the posterior descendant artery.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients less than 18 years' old
  • Pregnant and breast feeding women
  • Patients with a pacemaker, automated implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD), or left bundle branch block
  • Contraindication to abciximab, prasugrel, or clopidogrel
  • Cardiac arrest as initial presentation
  • Current medical condition with a life expectancy of < 6 months
  • Patients not living in France
  • Patients in cardiogenic shock
  • Culprit artery <2.5 mm
  • Absence of informed consent
  • Patients with initial TIMI 2 or 3 flow or no TIMI-3 flow restored after thrombus aspiration
  • Rescue PCI after fibrinolysis
  • Known creatinine clearance < 30 ml/min.
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
France
 
NCT01360242
2010-A01345-34
No
Centre Hospitalier de la Région d'Annecy
Centre Hospitalier de la Région d'Annecy
University Hospital, Grenoble
Principal Investigator: Loic BELLE, MD Centre Hospitalier de la Région d'Annecy
Centre Hospitalier de la Région d'Annecy
January 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP