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Benefits of Post-Pyloric Feeding Tubes in Critically Ill Patients

This study has been terminated.
(lack of funding)
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Glenn Whitman, Johns Hopkins University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01343316
First received: April 26, 2011
Last updated: September 17, 2013
Last verified: September 2013

April 26, 2011
September 17, 2013
November 2010
March 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
To determine whether transpyloric feeds are superior to transgastric feeds with regard to ability to give calories and meet nutritional goals. [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
To determine the time to goal calories. To determine the number and qualitative aspect of tracheal aspirations. To determine the time to initiate tube feeds once the decision has been made to place a tube, the number of x-rays required for placement, the time required for placement, the number of times tube needs to be replaced.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01343316 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
To determine the benefits of utilizing one type of transpyloric tube over another. One placed in the transpyloric position magnetically; the other propelled by peristalsis itself. [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Benefits include shorter time to appropriate placement and quicker time to goal tube feed rate.
To determine the benefits of utilizing one type of transpyloric tube over another. One placed in the transpyloric position magnetically; the other propelled by paristalsis itself. [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Benefits include shorter time to appropriate placement and quicker time to goal tube feed rate.
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Benefits of Post-Pyloric Feeding Tubes in Critically Ill Patients
Benefits of Post-Pyloric Feeding Tubes in Critically Ill Patients

The purpose of this study is to determine the benefit of feeding critically-ill patients beyond the stomach (post-pyloric). Furthermore, because of the advent of two new post-pyloric feeding tubes (Tiger 2 and Syncro BlueTube) designed to improve post-pyloric placement, the investigators will be evaluating the benefits of those two tubes as well.

Not Provided
Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Not Provided
Probability Sample

Critically ill patients in the ICU setting

Critical Illness
Device: Transpyloric feeding tubes (Nasogastric Tube (NG tube), Tiger2, Syncro BlueTube)
To determine the benefits of utilizing one type of transpyloric tube over another.
Other Names:
  • Nasogastric Tube (NG tube)
  • Tiger2
  • Syncro BlueTube
  • Transgastric tube
    Nasogastric (NG tube)
    Intervention: Device: Transpyloric feeding tubes (Nasogastric Tube (NG tube), Tiger2, Syncro BlueTube)
  • Transpyloric tube - Tiger2
    Self-propelled by paristaltic waves of the stomach
    Intervention: Device: Transpyloric feeding tubes (Nasogastric Tube (NG tube), Tiger2, Syncro BlueTube)
  • Transpyloric tube - Syncro BlueTube
    Magnetically placed
    Intervention: Device: Transpyloric feeding tubes (Nasogastric Tube (NG tube), Tiger2, Syncro BlueTube)

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Terminated
21
March 2013
March 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • patients admitted to the ICU who are deemed by the attending critical care physician to warrant tube feeds and expected to receive tube feeds for more than three days
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01343316
NA_00041559
No
Glenn Whitman, Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Glenn Whitman, MD Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
September 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP