Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome Identification in Paediatric Neurology

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified April 2011 by The University of Hong Kong
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong
Information provided by:
The University of Hong Kong
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01335282
First received: April 12, 2011
Last updated: April 13, 2011
Last verified: April 2011

April 12, 2011
April 13, 2011
April 2007
December 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01335282 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome Identification in Paediatric Neurology
Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome Identification in Paediatric Neurology

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has a history of more than two millenniums. It has been a common practice in China, Taiwan, Japan and Korea and is becoming increasingly popular worldwide in recent decades However, there is no general consensus for treatment of many diseases among TCM practitioners. In some specialties, such as neurology, there is not enough well documented case reports for practitioners to make reference with. Different practitioners may give different opinions according to their own experience and patients often feel frustrated about that.

Therefore, it is worth recording cases of neurological diseases, with accurate western medicine diagnosis and TCM theory explained. Possible TCM treatments can be suggested accordingly. Being an academic research supervised by western medicine doctor, this study can help to suggest more objective opinion with least conflict of interest.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has a history of more than two millenniums. It has been a common practice in China, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. In recent decades, it is becoming increasingly popular worldwide(Victor S. Sierpina 2005). Studies in Hong Kong, showed that TCM is quite common among children in Hong Kong, with about a quarter of children consulting a pediatrician are concurrently using Chinese Medicine.(Lee 2006; Li 2006).

However, there is a lack of standardized protocol for treatment of many diseases among TCM practitioners. In some specialties, such as neurology, there is not enough well documented case reports for TCM practitioners to make reference. Different TCM practitioners may give different opinions according to their own experience and patients often feel frustrated about that.

Therefore, it is worth recording cases of neurological diseases, with accurate western medicine diagnosis and TCM theory explained. Possible TCM treatments can be suggested accordingly. Being an academic research supervised by western medicine doctor, this study can help to suggest more objective opinion with least conflict of interest.

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Non-Probability Sample

From Primary care clinic

Other Diagnoses and Conditions
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
100
December 2017
December 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients receiving medical care in the Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine in Queen Mary Hospital or the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital, and
  • Patients (or their care takers) who are able to provide accurate information about their signs and symptoms

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients (or their care takers) who are unable to report a reliable medical history
Both
up to 18 Years
Yes
Contact: Virginia CN Wong, Professor 2255 4485 vcnwong@hkucc.hku.hk
Contact: Vanessa LY Chu, MChinMed 2255 3454 vchu@hku.hk
China
 
NCT01335282
UW07-163
No
Prof Virginia CN Wong, Department of Peadiatrics and Adolescent Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
The University of Hong Kong
Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong
Principal Investigator: Virginia CN Wong, Professor The University of Hong Kong
The University of Hong Kong
April 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP