Differential Diagnosis for the Causes of Subclavian Steal for Patients With Vascular Access in the Forearm

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ling-Chih, Wu, Mennonite Christian Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01263301
First received: December 16, 2010
Last updated: February 3, 2013
Last verified: February 2013

December 16, 2010
February 3, 2013
August 2010
July 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Change of Subclavian Flow to Normal Flow Pattern During Cuff Test [ Time Frame: two years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    we used carotid duplex duplex to study the change of subclavian arterial flow during cuff test to see if there is any difference between normal participants and patients under hemodialysis. There are two patterns seen. One is that the subclavian arterial flow reversed to normal flow pattern during cuff test. The other is that there is no change of subclavian flow pattern when the flow is stopped in the arm by cuff test.
  • no Change of Subclavian Arterial Flow During Cuff Test [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    we used carotid duplex duplex to study the change of subclavian arterial flow during cuff test to see if there is any difference between normal participants and patients under hemodialysis. There are two patterns seen. One is that the subclavian arterial flow reversed to normal flow pattern during cuff test. The other is that there is no change of subclavian flow pattern when the flow is stopped in the arm by cuff test.
  • Change of Vertebral Flow to Normal Flow Pattern During Cuff Test [ Time Frame: two year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    we used carotid duplex duplex to study the change of vertebral arterial flow during cuff test to see if there is any difference between normal participants and patients under hemodialysis. There are two patterns seen. One is that the vertebral arterial flow reversed to normal flow pattern during cuff test. The other is that there is no change of vertebral flow pattern when the flow is stopped in the arm by cuff test.
  • no Change of Vertebral Arterial Flow During Cuff Test [ Time Frame: 2 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    we used carotid duplex duplex to study the change of vertebral arterial flow during cuff test to see if there is any difference between normal participants and patients under hemodialysis. There are two patterns seen. One is that the vertebral arterial flow reversed to normal flow pattern during cuff test. The other is that there is no change of vertebral flow pattern when the flow is stopped in the arm by cuff test.
Is the duplex finding specific to patients with vascular access in the arm? [ Time Frame: two years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
we will compare duplex findings for patients with subclavian steal syndromes with and without vascular access in the upper limb to see if there is different duplex findings.
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01263301 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Differential Diagnosis for the Causes of Subclavian Steal for Patients With Vascular Access in the Forearm
Differential Diagnosis for the Causes of Subclavian Steal for Patients With Vascular Access in the Forearm

Subclavian steal phenomenon is normally observed in patients with stenosis of subclavian artery proximal to orifice of vertebral artery(V0). However, uremic patients undergoing hemodialysis using vascular access in the arm or forearm may also develop dialysis associated steal syndrome(DASS).For patients with symptomatic subclavian steal phenomenon, the treatment for these two groups is different. The investigators want to see if the investigators can use noninvasive duplex examination instead of invasive conventional angiography to do the differential diagnosis.

Carotid duplex is widely used for diagnosis of subclavian steal syndrome. We have a patient who suffered from acute brain stem stroke after receiving hemodialysis for months. He has DM related uremia and the vascular access is in the forearm. Subclavian steal was found on duplex in the same arm for hemodialysis. We used standard cuff test for diagnosis of subclavian steal by carotid duplex examination. Accidentally, we found the flow of subclavian artery was back to normal when the cuff is on that stops the flow. We want to see if this phenomenon can be used to serve as a differential diagnostic tool for differentiation of subclavian steal caused by stenosis of subclavian artery or due to DASS.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Diagnostic
Subclavian Steal
Device: carotid duplex
Carotid duplex in the differential diagnosis of subclavian steal syndrome due to Arteriovenous Hemodialysis access in the Ipsilateral arm
Other Name: steal syndrome
  • Active Comparator: carotid duplex for hemolytic patients wtih SSS
    assigned intervention:carotid duplex
    Intervention: Device: carotid duplex
  • Active Comparator: carotid duplex for nonhemolytic patients with SSS
    Intervention: Device: carotid duplex
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
16
July 2011
July 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • patients who revealed subclavian steal in the duplex study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • patients who has vascular access in the arm instead of the forearm
Both
Not Provided
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Taiwan
 
NCT01263301
10-06-024-ER
No
Ling-Chih, Wu, Mennonite Christian Hospital
Mennonite Christian Hospital
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: lingchih wu Mennonite Christian Hospital
Mennonite Christian Hospital
February 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP