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Measuring Adherence to Control Hypertension (MATCH)

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified February 2013 by Columbia University
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ian Kronish, Columbia University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01257347
First received: December 8, 2010
Last updated: February 11, 2013
Last verified: February 2013

December 8, 2010
February 11, 2013
January 2011
June 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Appropriateness of clinician hypertension management [ Time Frame: 1 month clinic visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
This is assessed using an algorithm in which patients are categorized as adherent or non-adherent based on electronic monitoring. If patients are adherent (summary measure of adherence to blood pressure medications in the week prior to visit is ≥ 80%), then hypertension management is appropriate if clinicians intensify the hypertension regimen or order testing for secondary hypertension. If patients are non-adherent (summary measure of adherence < 80%), then hypertension management is appropriate if clinicians take action to increase adherence through counseling or regimen simplification.
focal neurological deficits persisting for more than 24 hours focal neurological deficits persisting for more than 24 hours [ Time Frame: within the first 30 days (plus or minus 3 days) after surgery ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Evidence of clinically definite ischemic stroke (focal neurological deficits persisting for more than 24 hours) confirmed by non-investigational CT or MRI Time Frame: within the first 30 days (plus or minus 3 days) after surgery
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01257347 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Appropriateness of Regimen intensification [ Time Frame: 1 month clinic visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    This will be determined based on abstracting information from the electronic medical record after the 1-month visit using a standardized instrument. An outcome assessor who is blinded to clinician and patient group assignment will assess whether, during the 1-month visit, the provider intensified the blood pressure regimen (added or increased dose of medications). All prescribing and test ordering at the recruitment clinic is recorded in the electronic medical record.
  • Appropriateness of Adherence counseling [ Time Frame: 1 month clinic visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    This will be determined based on interviewing patients immediately after the 1-month visit using a standardized questionnaire. A research assistant who is blinded to group assignment will ask patients questions that assess whether clinicians counseled them about taking their blood pressure medications during that most recent visit. These questions are adapted from a validated questionnaire that assesses provider communication about blood pressure medications.
  • Appropriateness of hypertension regimen simplification [ Time Frame: 1 month clinic visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    This will be determined by abstracting data from the electronic medical record after the 1-month visit using a standardized instrument. An outcome assessor who is blinded to clinician and patient group assignment will assess whether, during the 1-month visit, the provider simplified the regimen by switching from a short-acting, multi-day dosing medication to a long-acting, once per day medication or switched two medication to a single combination pill. All prescribing and test ordering at the recruitment clinic is recorded in the electronic medical record.
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Measuring Adherence to Control Hypertension
Electronically Measuring Medication Adherence to Improve the Management of Uncontrolled Hypertension

The purpose of this study is to test whether accurately measuring patients' adherence to their blood pressure medications with electronic pillbox monitors and then providing clinicians with this information can improve the clinical management of uncontrolled hypertension.

Despite the presence of numerous effective medications, one-half of the adults receiving treatment for hypertension in the United States have uncontrolled blood pressure. At least one-third of these hypertensive patients are not adherent to their blood pressure medications. Given this high rate of non-adherence, clinicians will ideally consider whether their patients are taking their pills before deciding whether to intensify a blood pressure regimen. Yet, in practice, clinicians are often unsure about their patients' level of adherence. This uncertainty limits clinicians' ability to optimally manage hypertension. Electronic medication monitors represent the gold-standard for objectively measuring day-to-day adherence. As a result, they have the potential to best reduce uncertainty regarding medication adherence. The goal of this study is to test whether providing clinicians with an objective measure of medication adherence obtained through electronic monitoring can improve clinician management of uncontrolled hypertension. When data from monitoring indicate poor adherence, it may motivate clinicians to counsel their patients on adherence. Conversely, when data from monitoring indicate good adherence among patients with uncontrolled hypertension, it may motivate clinicians to intensify treatment rather than presume patients were non-adherent.

To test this hypothesis, this study will first enroll and randomize 30 primary care clinicians. Clinicians randomized to the intervention will be trained in the use of a quantitative report that summarizes their patients' adherence to blood pressure medications; they will receive these reports during visits with patients who later get enrolled in the study.

The study will then enroll 300 patients with uncontrolled hypertension from the same clinic. These patients will then have their adherence to up to 4 blood pressure medications measured by an electronic pillbox. The MedSignals® pillbox (LIFETECHniques Inc., San Antonio, TX) is small (5"x3½"x1"), easily portable, and can simultaneous monitor adherence to up to four medications. The device records a pill as taken each time the individual pillbox lid is opened and closed. Data on adherence are easily uploaded (< 1 minute) by connecting the pillbox to a telephone line.

Patients will return to the clinic after 1 month of taking their pills from the electronic pillbox for a visit with a research assistant and their clinician. At this time, data from the pillboxes will be downloaded and used to generate an adherence report. The report will summarize the percent of days that blood pressure medications were taken as prescribed during the monitoring period and will provide guidance on how to take action based on the data. After the report is generated (< 5 minutes), patients will attend visits with their clinicians. Clinicians in the intervention group will receive the adherence report at the time of this visit whereas clinicians in the control group will treat patients according to usual care (without report). Hypertension management during the 1-month clinic visit will be assessed after the visit by 1) reviewing the medical note to determine if clinicians intensified hypertension treatment and 2) surveying patients to determine if clinicians counseled them on adherence. Hypertension management will then be compared between groups.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Hypertension
Behavioral: Electronically-measuring adherence to antihypertensive medications
During clinical visits with patients with uncontrolled hypertension, clinicians in the intervention arm will be provided with a quantitative summary of their patients' electronically-monitored adherence to antihypertensive medications. The summary will be in the form of a report that fits onto one page and lists the percent of days patients correctly adhered to each of the monitored BP medications and the mean adherence to the whole regimen. Adherence data will be provided for the 7-days and 1-month prior to the clinic visit. The report will also show the number of days patients exceeded the recommended number of pill container openings. Clinicians in the intervention arm will get a brief training (<10 minutes) in the interpretation and use of the report at the time of enrollment.
  • No Intervention: No Intervention
    Clinicians in the control arm will not receive any electronically-monitored medication adherence information at the 1-month visit and will be expected to manage hypertension according to their usual care.
  • Experimental: Electronically-measuring adherence
    During clinical visits with patients with uncontrolled hypertension, clinicians in the intervention arm will be provided with a quantitative summary of their patients' electronically-monitored adherence to antihypertensive medications. The summary will be in the form of a report that fits onto one page and lists the percent of days patients correctly adhered to each of the monitored BP medications and the mean adherence to the whole regimen. Adherence data will be provided for the 7-days and 1-month prior to the clinic visit. The report will also show the number of days patients exceeded the recommended number of pill container openings. Clinicians in the intervention arm will get a brief training (<10 minutes) in the interpretation and use of the report at the time of enrollment.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Electronically-measuring adherence to antihypertensive medications
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
300
December 2014
June 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • clinical diagnosis of hypertension
  • prescribed at least one blood pressure medication
  • uncontrolled blood pressure on at least 2 clinic visits (SBP ≥140 or DBP≥90 if no diabetes mellitus (DM) or chronic kidney disease (CKD; glomerular filtration rate <60mL/min); SBP ≥130 or DBP ≥80 if DM or CKD)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • non-English, non-Spanish speaking
  • live in institutional setting
  • severe visual impairment
  • terminal non-cardiovascular illness (<6 month prognosis)
  • simultaneously enrolled in another cardiovascular trial
  • unable to return for follow-up
  • no access to a telephone
  • age>80
Both
18 Years to 80 Years
No
Contact: Ian Kronish, MD, MPH 212-342-1335 ik2293@columbia.edu
United States
 
NCT01257347
AAAI1720, K23HL098359
Yes
Ian Kronish, Columbia University
Columbia University
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Principal Investigator: Ian M Kronish, MD, MPH Columbia University
Columbia University
February 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP