Prevention of HIV and STDs in Drug Using Women (WTW)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
Washington University School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01235091
First received: November 3, 2010
Last updated: November 4, 2010
Last verified: November 2010

November 3, 2010
November 4, 2010
August 2000
November 2004   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01235091 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Prevention of HIV and STDs in Drug Using Women
Prevention of HIV and STDs in Drug Using Women

Women Teaching Women (WTW) is proposed by a team of Washington University investigators who have focused on HIV prevention efforts among out-of-treatment injecting drug users (IDUs) and crack cocaine users, since 1988. Our peer-delivered prevention model was successful in reducing cocaine use among men. The investigators believe no differences were found in drug and sexual risk behaviors for women because the intervention lacked gender-specificity. Thus, the investigators propose to tailor our previous intervention to women's needs to determine the shorter and intermediate term effectiveness of a gender-specific model on reducing drug use and sexual risks. The urgency for women-focused interventions is highlighted by increasing HIV/STD rates among women nationwide. The intervention is designed to bring the HIV prevention message to women in a public health environment. The three-arm intervention, which targets out-of-treatment drug-using women, will assess the differential impact of a woman-centered standard intervention alone, the same standard intervention plus a well-woman exam, and those plus the addition of 4 educational sessions. This proposal responds to two NIDA PAs: 95-083 (Women's HIV Risk and Protective Behaviors) and 96-018 (Drug Abuse Prevention Intervention for Women and Minorities). Our risk reduction, epidemiological and technology transfer aims include:

Risk Reduction Aims:

  1. Recruit out-of-treatment female drug injectors, heroin, crack/cocaine and methamphetamine users to into an intervention aimed at reducing high risk sexual and drug use behaviors. Street outreach, bars and clubs, shelters, health fairs and daycare facilities will be used to reach these vulnerable women at risk.
  2. Administer a modified theory-based, peer-delivered, gender and culture-specific intervention that encourages women to reduce their high risk drug and sexual behaviors. Women will be randomly assigned to one of three peer-delivered interventions: a modified NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention (SI), the SI + Well-Woman Exam (SI+WWE), or the SI+Well-Woman Exam + 4 Educational Sessions (SI+WWE+4ES). The Standard Intervention will be delivered by peers; the Well-Woman Examination will be conducted by a nurse practitioner; the four 2 hour educational sessions will be conducted by peer facilitators from area drug treatment programs paired with a community mental health or health professional.
  3. Assess the effectiveness of the interventions in reducing drug and sexual risk at 4 and 12 months post-intervention, controlling for baseline characteristics.
  4. Evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of each intervention.

    Epidemiologic Aim:

  5. Assess: a) incidence of HIV, Hepatitis B and C, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea 12 months post-intervention; b) change in HIV risk and drug and alcohol use at 4 and 12 months post-intervention; c) the effect of psychopathology on behavior change at 12 months post-intervention; d) lifetime history of substance abuse and service utilization for mental and physical problems at baseline.

    Technology Transfer Aim:

  6. Disseminate findings to the scientific community, practitioners and community members in formats that are appropriate, understandable, and usable in order that the best possible women-centered intervention can be developed for reducing HIV risk behaviors. The investigators propose to create a WebSite and present findings at local, national and international symposia. Manuals describing the interventions will be developed and made available to the field.
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Interventional
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Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • HIV
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Substance Abuse
  • Behavioral: NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention plus HIV/STD testing
    At the end of Baseline Session I, HIV pre-test counseling, per the NIDA Cooperative Agreement, was delivered, along with education about STD prevention, and biological samples were collected to test for HIV, Hepatitis C, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea. At Baseline Session II, HIV post-test counseling was conducted and women were given their random group assignment.
  • Behavioral: Standard Intervention plus Well-Woman Exam
    At the end of Baseline Session I, HIV pre-test counseling, per the NIDA Cooperative Agreement, was delivered, along with education about STD prevention, and biological samples were collected to test for HIV, Hepatitis C, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea. At Baseline Session II, HIV post-test counseling was conducted and women were given their random group assignment. This group was assigned to additionally receive a well-woman examination within seven days.
  • Behavioral: Standard Intervention plus Well-Woman Exam and Peer-Delivered Intervention
    At the end of Baseline Session I, HIV pre-test counseling, per the NIDA Cooperative Agreement, was delivered, along with education about STD prevention, and biological samples were collected to test for HIV, Hepatitis C, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea. At Baseline Session II, HIV post-test counseling was conducted and women were given their random group assignment. This group was assigned to receive a well-woman exam within seven days along with four two-hour peer-delivered educational sessions, covering health and nutrition, stress and coping, substance abuse, and HIV/AIDS.
  • Standard
    NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention plus HIV/STD testing
    Intervention: Behavioral: NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention plus HIV/STD testing
  • Experimental: SI/WWE
    NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention plus HIV/STD testing along with Well-Woman Exam
    Interventions:
    • Behavioral: NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention plus HIV/STD testing
    • Behavioral: Standard Intervention plus Well-Woman Exam
  • Experimental: SI/WWE/PD
    NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention plus HIV/STD testing along with Well-Woman Exam and Peer-delivered Enhanced Intervention
    Interventions:
    • Behavioral: NIDA Cooperative Agreement Standard Intervention plus HIV/STD testing
    • Behavioral: Standard Intervention plus Well-Woman Exam and Peer-Delivered Intervention
Ruger JP, Abdallah AB, Luekens C, Cottler L. Cost-effectiveness of peer-delivered interventions for cocaine and alcohol abuse among women: a randomized controlled trial. PLoS One. 2012;7(3):e33594. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0033594. Epub 2012 Mar 20. Erratum in: PLoS One. 2012;7(8): doi/10.1371/annotation/d9d8b547-8154-48a1-b527-d0c51285ed3c. Prah Ruger, Jennifer [corrected to Ruger, Jennifer Prah]..

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
501
November 2004
November 2004   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Over age 18
  • Reported sexual activity in the prior 4 months
  • Recent cocaine, heroin or amphetamine use
  • Reported living in the St. Louis metropolitan area

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Under age 18
  • No sexual activity in the prior 4 months
  • No recent use of cocaine, heroin or amphetamines
  • Resides outside the St. Louis metropolitan area
Female
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Not Provided
 
NCT01235091
97-0438, R01DA011622
Yes
Linda B. Cottler, Principal Investigator, Professor of Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Washington University School of medicine
Washington University School of Medicine
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Principal Investigator: Linda B. Cottler, PhD, MPH Washington University
Washington University School of Medicine
November 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP