Psychological Treatment of Overweight Binge Eaters

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Washington University School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01208272
First received: August 31, 2010
Last updated: September 22, 2010
Last verified: September 2010

August 31, 2010
September 22, 2010
April 1994
March 1998   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
To investigate the short and long-term efficacy of two treatments for binge eating among the overweight: Group Cognitive-Behavior (CBT) and Group Interpersonal Therapy (IPT).
Assessments of binge eating and associated eating disorder paychopathology, general psychological functioning, and weight occurred before treatment, at post treatment, and at 4-month intervals up to 12 months following treatment.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01208272 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Psychological Treatment of Overweight Binge Eaters
A Randomized Comparison of Group-Behavioral Therapy and Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Overweight Individuals With Binge-Eating Disorder

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has documented efficacy for the treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been shown to reduce binge eating but its long-term impact and time course on other BED-related symptoms remain largely unknown. This study compares the effects of group CBT and group IPT across BED-related symptoms among overweight individuals with BED.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has documented efficacy for the treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been shown to reduce binge eating but its long-term impact and time course on other BED-related symptoms remain largely unknown. This study compares the effects of group CBT and group IPT across BED-related symptoms among overweight individuals with BED. METHODS: One hundred sixty-two overweight patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for BED were randomly assigned to 20 weekly sessions of either group CBT or group IPT. Assessments of binge eating and associated eating disorder psychopathology, general psychological functioning, and weight occurred before treatment, at posttreatment, and at 4-month intervals up to 12 months following treatment. RESULTS: Binge-eating recovery rates were equivalent for CBT and IPT at posttreatment (64 [79%] of 81 vs 59 [73%] of 81) and at 1-year follow-up (48 [59%] of 81 vs 50 [62%] of 81). Binge eating increased slightly through follow-up but remained significantly below pretreatment levels. Across treatments, patients had similar significant reductions in associated eating disorders and psychiatric symptoms and maintenance of gains through follow-up. Dietary restraint decreased more quickly in CBT but IPT had equivalent levels by later follow-ups. Patients' relative weight decreased significantly but only slightly, with the greatest reduction among patients sustaining recovery from binge eating from posttreatment to 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Group IPT is a viable alternative to group CBT for the treatment of overweight patients with BED. Although lacking a nonspecific control condition limits conclusions about treatment specificity, both treatments showed initial and long-term efficacy for the core and related symptoms of BED.

Interventional
Phase 1
Phase 2
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Binge Eating Disorder
  • Cognitive Therapy/Methods
  • Mental Disorders/Epidemiology
  • Obesity/Epidemiology
  • Obesity/Therapy
  • Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  • Behavioral: Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)
Experimental: Binge Eating Disorder/Therapy
Interventions:
  • Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  • Behavioral: Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
162
March 1999
March 1998   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • DSM-IV research criteria for binge-eating disorder
  • Average of greater than or equal to 2 days of binge eating per week for at least 6 months' duration
  • Marked stress regarding binge eating
  • At least 3 to 5 associated behavioral features (e.g. eating when not physically hungry) Other study criteria
  • 18-65 years old
  • Body mass index, 27-48 kg/m squared

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnant or planning to become pregnant
  • Taking weight-affecting or psychotropic medications
  • Psychiatric conditions warranting immediate treatment
  • Current enrollment in psychotherapy or a weight loss program
Both
18 Years to 65 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01208272
R29MH51384
Not Provided
Denise E. Wilfley, Ph.D., Yale University
Washington University School of Medicine
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Denise E Wilfley, Ph.D. Washington University Early Recognition Center
Washington University School of Medicine
September 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP