Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Case Reports and Analysis With Ultrasound Imaging

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
EMG Labs of Arizona Arthritis & Rheumatology Associates
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01196637
First received: September 5, 2010
Last updated: September 8, 2010
Last verified: September 2010

September 5, 2010
September 8, 2010
June 2010
September 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Brachial plexus compression on ultrasound imaging in thoracic outlet syndrome patients [ Time Frame: 4 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01196637 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
No brachial plexus compression in normal subjects [ Time Frame: 4 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Case Reports and Analysis With Ultrasound Imaging
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Case Reports and Analysis - Ultrasound Imaging and Pathomechanics of Brachial Plexus Compression

Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the brachial plexus, in most cases under the pectoralis minor muscle in the infraclavicular region of the shoulder. The hypothesis is that ultrasound imaging can be used to visualize brachial plexus compression and distortion of the pectoralis muscle during arm activity, such as abduction, and that normal subjects will not demonstrate any plexus compression or muscle distortion.

Four patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) underwent clinical exam and nerve testing to prove that they had TOS and no other nerve abnormality. They subsequently had ultrasound imaging of the shoulder (infraclavicular region) at rest and during arm abduction stress testing. Two control subjects had similar clinical exams and nerve testing to prove they did not have TOS, and then underwent similar ultrasound stress testing. The TOS patients demonstrated brachial plexus compression and pectoralis minor muscle distortion during the stress tests, and the normal subjects showed no plexus compression or muscle distortion.

Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Non-Probability Sample

Adult patients with upper limb symptoms of pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness, aggravated by arm abduction; Adult patients with no upper limb symptoms

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
Not Provided
  • Thoracic outlet syndrome
    These patients have documented thoracic outlet syndrome
  • Normal Subjects
    These patients have no thoracic outlet syndrome
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
6
September 2010
September 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

INCLUSION CRITERIA:

Thoracic outlet patients must have:

  • symptoms consistent with thoracic outlet syndrome, and
  • no electrical testing abnormality, and
  • positive arm abduction stress tests.

Normal subjects must have:

  • no upper limb symptoms, or
  • normal nerve testing, and
  • negative arm abduction stress test

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Thoracic outlet patients excluded if they have:

  • nerve test abnormalities, or
  • negative arm abduction stress test

Normals excluded if they have:

  • abnormalities on nerve testing, or
  • positive arm abduction stress tests
Both
18 Years to 70 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01196637
TOS-US BP JAOA
No
Benjamin M. Sucher, D.O. / Medical Director, EMG Labs of AARA
EMG Labs of Arizona Arthritis & Rheumatology Associates
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Benjamin M Sucher, D.O. EMG Labs of AARA
EMG Labs of Arizona Arthritis & Rheumatology Associates
September 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP