Mothers With a History of Depression and Their 10-14 Year Old Daughters

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
Stanford University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01129752
First received: May 21, 2010
Last updated: June 21, 2011
Last verified: June 2011

May 21, 2010
June 21, 2011
February 2004
April 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Onset of depression [ Time Frame: 18 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
participants are interviewed in an 18-month follow-up session
Intergenerational transmission of psychopathology [ Time Frame: Measured every 18 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01129752 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Differential patterns of information processing, neuroendocrine functioning, and neural activation on the development of mood disorders in adult women and their young children [ Time Frame: 18 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Mothers With a History of Depression and Their 10-14 Year Old Daughters
The Neural Correlates of Mood and Cognitive Bias in a Population at Risk for Depression: Maternal Cognitive and Emotional Functioning

The purpose of this study is to investigate risk factors associated with depression and how such factors might be transmitted cross-generationally. The investigators are conducting an integrative assessment of emotion regulation and stress reactivity in a group of mothers with and without a history of depression and their daughters.

The purpose of this study is to investigate risk factors associated with depression and how such factors might be transmitted cross-generationally. We are conducting an integrative assessment of emotion regulation and stress reactivity in a group of mothers with and without a history of depression and their daughters. We use a range of methodologies to evaluate these processes, including self-report measures, information-processing performance, HPA-axis functioning and reactivity, and neural responses to emotional stimuli following exposure to stressful experiences.

Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples With DNA
Description:

All participants are asked to submit saliva samples during their second session using sterile salivette containers in order to assess cortisol levels. There is no risk involved in giving these samples.

Non-Probability Sample

Eligible mothers must read and speak English fluently and have a child between the ages of 9 and 15 years old. Mothers must either have no history of psychopathology or have a history of depression during their child's lifetime.

  • Depression
  • Depressive Disorder, Major
Other: No intervention
there is no intervention for this study
children at risk for depression
children at familial risk for depression
Intervention: Other: No intervention
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
240
April 2011
April 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Eligible mothers must read and speak English fluently and have a child between the ages of 9 and 15 years old.
  • Mothers must either have no history of psychopathology or have a history of depression during their child's lifetime.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Eligible mothers cannot:

    • currently be in treatment for drug or alcohol abuse
    • have significant symptomatology related to psychopathology outside of depression
    • have a medical history of neurological injury or impairment.
  • Mothers who meet the requirements for inclusion in the control group must not have a history of any Axis I disorder.
Female
9 Years to 15 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01129752
SU-03172010-5264, 13058
Not Provided
Ian H. Gotlib, Principal Investigator, Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford University
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Principal Investigator: Ian H Gotlib, PhD Stanford University Department of Psychology
Stanford University
June 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP