Helping Problem Drinkers on the Internet

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Health Canada
Information provided by:
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01114919
First received: April 30, 2010
Last updated: December 1, 2010
Last verified: December 2010

April 30, 2010
December 1, 2010
May 2010
November 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Frequency of consumption [ Time Frame: 6 months and 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Usual number of drinks per occasion [ Time Frame: 6 months and 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Frequency of consuming 5 or more drinks on one occasion [ Time Frame: 6 months and 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Typical weekly consumption [ Time Frame: 6 months and 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Highest number of drinks on one occasion [ Time Frame: 6 months and 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01114919 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Helping Problem Drinkers on the Internet
Helping Problem Drinkers on the Internet

The main aim of this study is to compare the impact of a minimal and a full Internet-based self-help intervention for problem drinkers in the general population.

Many problem drinkers never access any treatment services. Because of the individual as well as societal costs of heavy alcohol consumption, it is essential to find ways to intervene and provide assistance to problem drinkers. The Internet takes treatment to problem drinkers rather than requiring them to come to treatment, resulting in increased options for help for alcohol abusers. There is a preponderance of internet websites which are designed for self change in areas that include alcohol use. To date, however, there has been minimal scientific evaluation regarding the efficacy and safety of such programs.

Our own previous research found that we could reduce alcohol consumption by about three drinks per week at a six-month follow-up using a minimal, personalized feedback Internet-based intervention. Building on this, the current project will attempt to increase the impact of Internet-based interventions as well as produce sustained reductions in drinking by adding an extended online self-help service to this already promising minimal intervention. More specifically, this randomized, double blinded study will compare and evaluate the efficacy of two different degrees of treatment intervention for problem drinkers: a minimal one ("Check your Drinking") and a full one ("Alcohol Help Centre").

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Alcohol Dependence
  • Behavioral: Check Your Drinking (CYD)
    Internet based program of lower intensity as compared to the "Alcohol Help Centre. It was designed to assesses drinking patterns, increase self-awareness of individual triggers, and set and achieve goals regarding abstinence.
  • Behavioral: Alcohol Help Centre (AHC)
    Internet based program of higher intensity as compared to the "Check Your Drinking" intervention. It was designed to assesses drinking patterns, increase self-awareness of individual triggers, and set and achieve goals regarding abstinence.
Not Provided
Cunningham JA. Comparison of two internet-based interventions for problem drinkers: randomized controlled trial. J Med Internet Res. 2012 Aug 1;14(4):e107. doi: 10.2196/jmir.2090.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
246
Not Provided
November 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Resident of Ontario
  • 19 years of age or over
  • Have consumed alcohol in the one month prior to the telephone survey.
  • Have consumed alcohol in the one month prior to the telephone survey.
  • A score of 8 or over on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)
  • Indicate an interest in receiving self-help materials
  • Have home access to the Internet
  • Are willing to participate in follow-up at six and twelve month intervals

Exclusion Criteria:

  • None
Both
19 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT01114919
282/2009
No
Dr. John Cunningham, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Health Canada
Principal Investigator: John Cunningham, PhD Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
December 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP