Nicotine Patch Trial in Syrian Primary Care Settings

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Memphis
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01085032
First received: March 10, 2010
Last updated: NA
Last verified: February 2010
History: No changes posted

March 10, 2010
March 10, 2010
August 2006
July 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Prolonged Abstinence [ Time Frame: 7 weeks, 6 months and 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Self report and verified by exhaled CO levels of less than 10ppm. Prolonged abstinence will be defined as abstinence sustained after a 2 week grace period.
Same as current
No Changes Posted
  • 7 day point prevalent abstinence [ Time Frame: 7 weeks, 6 months and 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    defined as non-smoking during the last 7 days and exhaled CO levels of <10ppm
  • Withdrawal symptoms [ Time Frame: 7 weeks, 6 months, 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measured with the Withdrawal Symptoms List (Hughes et al., 1986, 1991).
  • Depressive symptomatology [ Time Frame: 7 weeks, 6 months, 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    CES-D; Radloff, 1977
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Nicotine Patch Trial in Syrian Primary Care Settings
Transdermal Nicotine Therapy as an Adjunct to Behavioral Smoking Cessation Counseling in Syrian Primary Care Settings

The study is a two-arm, parallel group, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind trial, conducted at four primary health care centers in Aleppo, Syria, to test the efficacy of transdermal nicotine patch therapy vs. placebo patch therapy, when delivered with behavioral counseling, on smoking cessation rates.

The study is a two-arm, parallel group, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind trial, conducted at four primary health care centers in Aleppo, Syria, to test the efficacy of behavioral counseling with and without transdermal nicotine therapy on long-term smoking cessation rates. The trial will be conducted at four primary care clinics in Aleppo, Syria that are sponsored by private or non governmental organizations. Clinic physicians will be trained to provide a brief assessment of each patient's smoking status and motivation to quit, and to refer appropriate patients to a cessation clinic within the primary care center. Eligible and interested smokers will be randomized to receive behavioral cessation counseling + nicotine patch or behavioral cessation counseling + placebo patch. Behavioral counseling will be delivered by a physician at each clinic.

After eligibility is determined and a description of the cessation program has been provided, written informed consent will be obtained. When literacy is a concern, the consent form will be read to the subjects who will then mark the form to indicate consent.

Participants will provide baseline demographic data (age, gender, ethnicity, residence, marital status, education, occupation, income), smoking related information (smoking history, level of dependence, interest in quitting, comorbidities), and complete additional questionnaires to assess quitting self-efficacy, stage of change, withdrawal symptoms, and depression/mood.

Participants will then be allocated to one of two treatment conditions (Arm A: behavioral counseling + nicotine patch vs. Arm B: behavioral counseling + placebo patch) using random permuted blocks, stratified according to primary care center and gender. Specific behavioral and pharmacological intervention procedures are as follows:

Participants in Arm A will receive active transdermal nicotine, and participants in Arm B will receive placebo patch. Transdermal nicotine replacement was selected as the pharmacologic agent of choice, based on its ease of use, acceptability to patients, favorable side effect and contraindications profile, and its well researched and documented efficacy (Fiore et al., 1994). Additionally, our pilot intervention work in Syria indicates a high degree of acceptability of the patch as a potential smoking cessation intervention (Asfar et al., 2005).

In accordance with clinical practice guidelines in the U.S. (Fiore et al., 2000), participants will receive six weeks of patch treatment, 24 hour dose, using a step-down algorithm. Participants who smoke greater than 10 cigarettes/day will be receive two weeks of 21 mg patch, followed by two weeks of 14 mg patch, and then two weeks of 7 mg patch. Participants who smoke 5-9 cigarettes per day will receive four weeks of 14 mg patch, followed by two weeks of 7 mg.

Subjects in both arms receive three brief face-to-face counseling sessions and five brief (approximately 10 minute) phone counseling calls. Session 1 occurs 3-4 days before the scheduled quit day and focuses on preparing to quit. Calls 1 and 2 occur the day before and the day after quit day, respectively, and focus on surviving the first few days as a non-smoker. Session 2 takes place 7 days after the quit day and emphasizes provision of social support, problem solving, and coping with withdrawal symptoms and negative emotions. The final session occurs 14 days after quit day and emphasizes relapse prevention and coping skills training. An additional three phone calls occur 10, 30, and 45 days after quit day and provide social support, check progress, and reinforce coping skills. Follow-up assessments occur at 7 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months post-cessation.

Interventional
Phase 2
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Smoking Cessation
  • Drug: Transdermal Nicotine
    Subjects in the experimental group receive six weeks of nicotine patch treatment, 24 hour dose, using a step-down algorithm. Participants who smoke greater than 10 cigarettes/day receive two weeks of 21 mg patch, followed by two weeks of 14 mg patch, and then two weeks of 7 mg patch. Participants who smoke 5-9 cigarettes per day receive four weeks of 14 mg patch, followed by two weeks of 7 mg.
  • Drug: Placebo nicotine patch

    Subjects in the placebo condition receive an inert placebo patch matched for size, shape, color, and packaging.

    The same step-down dosing algorithm as in the experimental condition is used.

  • Experimental: Arm A
    Behavioral Counseling and Nicotine Patch
    Intervention: Drug: Transdermal Nicotine
  • Placebo Comparator: Arm B
    Behavioral counseling and placebo patch
    Intervention: Drug: Placebo nicotine patch
Ward KD, Asfar T, Al Ali R, Rastam S, Weg MW, Eissenberg T, Maziak W. Randomized trial of the effectiveness of combined behavioral/pharmacological smoking cessation treatment in Syrian primary care clinics. Addiction. 2013 Feb;108(2):394-403. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.04048.x. Epub 2012 Nov 19.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
269
July 2009
July 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18-65 years of age
  • smoking continuously for at least one year and smoking 5 cigarettes every day
  • Reside in the catchment area of one of the four primary care centers

Exclusion Criteria:

  • diagnosed with a generalized dermatology disease, liver failure, hyperthyroidism, or pheochromocytoma
  • current use of psychotropic drugs
  • past year history of drug or alcohol abuse, unstable cardiovascular, psychiatric, or debilitating diseases based on physician assessment.
  • currently pregnant, lactating, or intending to become pregnant in next 3 months
Both
18 Years to 65 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Syrian Arab Republic
 
NCT01085032
1R01DA024876
Yes
Kenneth D. Ward, PhD, University of Memphis
University of Memphis
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Kenneth D Ward, PhD University of Memphis
University of Memphis
February 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP