Effectiveness of Physiotherapy Interventions for Patients With Parkinson's Disease

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified March 2010 by Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01076712
First received: February 25, 2010
Last updated: March 9, 2010
Last verified: March 2010

February 25, 2010
March 9, 2010
March 2010
October 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline. Immediate, 3-month, 6-month and 1 year Post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Levodopa equivalent daily dosage (LEDD) [ Time Frame: Baseline. Immediate, 3-month, 6-month and 1 year Post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01076712 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Timed Up and Go Test [ Time Frame: Baseline. Immediate, 3-month, 6-month and 1 year Post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (Chinese version) [ Time Frame: Baseline. Immediate, 3-month, 6-month and 1 year Post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (Standard Chinese Version) [ Time Frame: Baseline. Immediate, 3-month, 6-month and 1 year Post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (Standard Chinese Version) - PDQ-39 (Chinese)
  • Number of Injurious Falls [ Time Frame: Baseline. Immediate, 3-month, 6-month and 1 year Post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Effectiveness of Physiotherapy Interventions for Patients With Parkinson's Disease
The Effectiveness of Physiotherapy Interventions in Patients With Parkinson's Disease, a Randomized Controlled Trial

Parkinson's Disease is an incurable and progressive disease. Treatment includes medication and non-pharmacological intervention such as physiotherapy. Physiotherapy is a main component of non-pharmacological interventions. It includes exercise to strengthen the muscles; improves balance and walking, and adopts the use of visual cue training. Treatment has been found to be effective in patients with mild impairment up to 6 months post-treatment. The present study will investigate the effectiveness of treatment for patients with mild to moderate impairment for short term (3-month) and long term (1 year). The hypothesis is that compared to patient education alone, physiotherapy intervention for patients with Parkinson's disease leads to improve function and quality of life.

Parkinson's disease (PD) is an incurable and progressive disease (Rubenis 2007). Current management include medical, neuro-surgical and non-pharmacological intervention. Physiotherapy is a major component in non-pharmacological interventions. Effective interventions including visual or auditory cues improves gait (Nieuwboer et al. 2007), exercise is effective in improving balance (Hirsch et al 2003); intense treadmill training improves motor control, quality of life and walking speed so as to sustain improvement in gait speed and motor control post 4 weeks of treatment (Herman et al 2007). Patient with PD attending physiotherapy twice weekly, one and half hour for 12 weeks showed improvement in walking speed and Activities of Daily Living (Ellis et al 2005). However, the majority of focus on patients in the Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2 to 3 and long term effect is lacking (Kwakkel et al 2007). A knowledge gap is present in the effectiveness of physiotherapy training of patients with Parkinson's disease in the more advanced stage of disease and long term effect is lacking. The aim of the study is to investigate the immediate, short-term & long-term clinical effects of physiotherapy training of patients with Parkinson's disease. The hypothesis is that compared to patient education alone, physiotherapy intervention for patients with Parkinson's disease leads to improve function and quality of life.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Parkinson Disease
  • Other: Physiotherapy Interventions
    Physiotherapy interventions including strengthening exercise, balance training, gait training with visual cus and gait training with treadmill
    Other Name: Physiotherapy Interventions
  • Other: Education Classes
    Education Classes
    Other Name: Education
  • Experimental: Physiotherapy Interventions
    Physiotherapy Interventions including strengthening exercise, balance training, gait training with visual cue, gait training with treadmill.
    Intervention: Other: Physiotherapy Interventions
  • Education
    Education
    Intervention: Other: Education Classes

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
112
October 2012
October 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Stable medication usage
  • Hoehn and Yahr stage II to IV
  • At least 1 score of 2 or more for at least 1 limb of either the tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesia item of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)
  • Able to walk independently
  • No severe cognitive impairments (Mini-Mental State Examination - Chinese Cantonese version) score greater than 24

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Other severe neurological, cardiopulmonary, or orthopedic disorders
  • Having participated in a physiotherapy or rehabilitation program in previous 2 months
Both
35 Years to 75 Years
No
Not Provided
Hong Kong
 
NCT01076712
KCKESOP0016a
No
WOO Cheuk Wai, Physiotherapy Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: CW WOO Physiotherapy Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong
March 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP