Kaletra: Therapy With Double Protease Inhibitors

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
AbbVie ( AbbVie (prior sponsor, Abbott) )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01075191
First received: February 23, 2010
Last updated: January 14, 2013
Last verified: January 2013

February 23, 2010
January 14, 2013
January 2004
September 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Percentage of Participants With Human Immunodeficiency Virus -1 Ribonucleic Acid (HIV-1 RNA) <50 Copies/mL [ Time Frame: Baseline (Week 0), Weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Viral load (number of HIV-1 RNA copies in the blood) was measured at baseline and scheduled study visits. A decrease in viral load is a measure used to assess the effectiveness of antiviral treatments. The percentage of participants with HIV RNA less than 50 copies/mL at each time point is presented.
Decline of virus load; reconstitution of the immune system with two protease inhibitors; evaluation of evolution of resistance mutations. [ Time Frame: Baseline, week 4, 12, 24, followed by 12 weeks' intervals up to 3 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01075191 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Change From Baseline in Absolute CD4 Cell Count [ Time Frame: Baseline (Week 0), Weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Increases in CD4 count are a biomarker for antiretroviral treatment effectiveness in restoring immunologic function. Changes in participants' CD4-positive (CD4+) T-lymphocyte counts were assessed by measuring the change from Baseline in the number of CD4+ cells at scheduled study visits.
  • Change From Baseline in Relative CD4 Cell Count [ Time Frame: Baseline (Week 0), Weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Increases in relative CD4 count (the percentage of total lymphocytes that are CD4 cells) are a biomarker for antiretroviral treatment effectiveness in restoring immunologic function. Changes in participants' CD4-positive (CD4+) T-lymphocyte counts were assessed by measuring the change from Baseline in the percentage of CD4+ cells at scheduled study visits.
  • Change From Baseline in Absolute CD8 Cell Count [ Time Frame: Baseline (Week 0), Weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Decreases in CD8 count are a biomarker for antiretroviral treatment effectiveness in restoring immunologic function. Changes in participants' CD8-positive (CD8+) T-lymphocyte counts were assessed by measuring the change from Baseline in the number of CD8+ cells at scheduled study visits.
  • Change From Baseline in Relative CD8 Cell Count [ Time Frame: Baseline (Week 0), Weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Decreases in relative CD8 count (the percentage of total lymphocytes that are CD8 cells) are a biomarker for antiretroviral treatment effectiveness in restoring immunologic function. Changes in participants' CD8-positive (CD8+) T-lymphocyte counts were assessed by measuring the change from Baseline in the percentage of CD8+ cells at scheduled study visits.
  • Change From Baseline in CD4/CD8 T-cell Ratio [ Time Frame: Baseline (Week 0), Weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio, also known as the T-lymphocyte helper/suppressor profile, presents the number of lymphocytes in the blood positive for CD4 cells compared with the number positive for CD8 cells. Changes in participants' CD4/CD8 T-lymphocyte ratio were assessed by measuring the change from Baseline in the ratio at scheduled study visits.
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Kaletra: Therapy With Double Protease Inhibitors
PMOS: Kaletra Double Protease Inhibitors

Therapy with lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) and one other protease inhibitor in Human Immunodeficiency Virus participants

This study is intended to observe and collect data on the usage, dosing, tolerability, and effectiveness of lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) when used as part of a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-free double protease regimen. Enrollment in the study was independent of the decision to prescribe Kaletra.

Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
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Non-Probability Sample

Community sample; Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected participants

Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Not Provided
HIV-infected participants

HIV-infected participants taking lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) and one other protease inhibitor.

Lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) dosing and administration according to the Summary of Product Characteristics (three 133 mg/33 mg capsules twice daily or two 200 mg/50 mg tablets twice daily).

Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
65
September 2011
September 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection
  • Participants on lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) and one other protease inhibitor

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Hypersensitivity against lopinavir, ritonavir or other ingredients
  • Severe liver insufficiency
  • No concomitant astemizole, terfenadine, oral midazolam, triazolam, cisapride, pimozide, amiodarone, ergotamine, dihydroergotamine, ergometrine, methylergometrine, vardenafil and St. John's wort
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Germany
 
NCT01075191
P05-103
No
AbbVie ( AbbVie (prior sponsor, Abbott) )
AbbVie (prior sponsor, Abbott)
Not Provided
Study Director: Stefan Simianer, MD AbbVie Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG, Medical Department
AbbVie
January 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP