The Impact of Short Message Services (SMS) on ARV Adherence in Western Kenya (CAPS)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Moi Univeristy
World Bank
Indiana University
Harvard University
Columbia University
University of California, San Diego
University of North Carolina
Information provided by:
Georgetown University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01058694
First received: January 27, 2010
Last updated: January 28, 2010
Last verified: January 2010

January 27, 2010
January 28, 2010
June 2007
December 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
MEMS Adherence [ Time Frame: 12 months follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01058694 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Frequency/incidence of ARV treatment interruptions [ Time Frame: 12 months follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
The Impact of Short Message Services (SMS) on ARV Adherence in Western Kenya
Adherence to ARV Treatment and Its Effects on Medium Run Socio-Economic Outcomes: Evidence From Western Kenya

The purpose of proposed research is to implement a randomized study that will allow us to understand and address a number of key barriers to patient adherence as well as study the effects of better adherence on health and socio-economic outcomes.

Several studies have shown that proper adherence to treatment regimens is essential for the effectiveness of ARV therapy (e.g Wools-Kaloustian et al. 2006). There is also evidence in that in some treatment programs in Africa, adherence rates are not always high (Gill et al. 2005). Even in settings where adherence levels are found to be high, numerous factors have been identified as being relevant, although the causal effects are unknown (Castro, 2006). As ARV treatment programs are scaled up in Africa, it is essential to understand the socio-economic determinants of adherence to ARV treatment, as well as the impact of interventions to support high levels of adherence. A secondary objective of this study is to understand the socio-economic impacts of higher adherence.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
  • AIDS
  • Antiretroviral Therapy
  • Medication Adherence
  • HIV Infections
Behavioral: Short Message Services to Support ARV therapy adherence
Short message services were sent to randomly selected consenting subjects on ARV therapy. The frequency and content of the message is varied in a factorial design.
  • Experimental: Weekly SMS, brief message
    Weekly SMS received on Monday at 12 noon
    Intervention: Behavioral: Short Message Services to Support ARV therapy adherence
  • Active Comparator: Control Group
    Receives a phone, but no messages.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Short Message Services to Support ARV therapy adherence
  • Experimental: Daily SMS, Brief message
    Receive daily brief message at 12 noon: "This is your reminder"
    Intervention: Behavioral: Short Message Services to Support ARV therapy adherence
  • Experimental: Daily SMS, Long Message
    Receive a daily long message at 12 noon: "This is your reminder + encouragement"
    Intervention: Behavioral: Short Message Services to Support ARV therapy adherence
  • Experimental: Weekly SMS, Long Message
    Weekly message sent at 12 noon on Mondays: "This is your reminder + encouragement"
    Intervention: Behavioral: Short Message Services to Support ARV therapy adherence
Pop-Eleches C, Thirumurthy H, Habyarimana JP, Zivin JG, Goldstein MP, de Walque D, Mackeen L, Haberer J, Kimaiyo S, Sidle J, Ngare D, Bangsberg DR. Mobile phone technologies improve adherence to antiretroviral treatment in a resource-limited setting: a randomized controlled trial of text message reminders. AIDS. 2011 Mar 27;25(6):825-34.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
720
July 2009
December 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients who had been on ARV therapy at the Chulaimbo Rural Health Center for a maximum of three months and providing consent to participate in the study.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients who had been on ARV therapy for more than 3 months.
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Kenya
 
NCT01058694
2008-005
No
James Habyarimana, PhD/Assistant Professor, Georgetown Public Policy Institute
Georgetown University
  • Moi Univeristy
  • World Bank
  • Indiana University
  • Harvard University
  • Columbia University
  • University of California, San Diego
  • University of North Carolina
Principal Investigator: John Sidle, MD Indiana University
Principal Investigator: Duncan Ngare, Phd Moi University
Principal Investigator: Harsha Thirumurthy, Phd University of North Carolina
Principal Investigator: Markus Goldstein, Phd World Bank
Principal Investigator: Joshua Graff-Zivin, Phd University of California, San Diego
Principal Investigator: Damien de Walque, Phd World Bank
Principal Investigator: Cristian Pop-Eleches, Phd Columbia University
Principal Investigator: David Bangsberg, MD Harvard Medical School
Georgetown University
January 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP